Fire and Archaeology

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Native American populations declined between 1492 and 1900 CE, instigated by the European colonization of the Americas. However, the magnitude, tempo, and ecological effects of this depopulation remain the source of enduring debates. Recently, scholars...

Person: Liebmann, Farella, Roos, Stack, Martini, Swetnam
Created Year: 2016
Type: Document

Interannual climate variations have been important drivers of wildfire occurrence in ponderosa pine forests across western North America for at least 400 years, but at finer scales of mountain ranges and landscapes human land uses sometimes over-rode...

Person: Swetnam, Farella, Roos, Liebmann, Falk, Allen
Created Year: 2016
Type: Document

While still not perfect, advancements in technology have made it possible to gather fire behavior data on actively burning wildland fires (Butler and others 2010, Jimenez and others 2007). The Adaptive Management Services Enterprise Team (AMSET: a...

Person: Vaillant, Ewell, Fites-Kaufman
Created Year: 2014
Type: Document