Fire and Archaeology

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In this episode of Fire Ecology Chats, Fire Ecology editor Bob Keane talks with Megan Friggens and Rachel Loehman about results from their study that identified the environmental and climate variables that best predict observed fire severity and fire...

Person: Keane, Friggens, Loehman
Created Year: 2022
Type: Media

Motivation: Rapid climate change is altering plant communities around the globe fundamentally. Despite progress in understanding how plants respond to these climate shifts, accumulating evidence suggests that disturbance could not only modify expected...

Person: Napier, Chipman
Created Year: 2022
Type: Document

As mega-fires have swept the North American West in recent decades, studies of past fire events have gained academic interest. Deep-time perspectives are necessary to better understand the periodicity of fire events and to identify basic drivers of...

Person: Damick, Krause, Rosen
Created Year: 2022
Type: Document

Background: Wildfires of uncharacteristic severity, a consequence of climate changes and accumulated fuels, can cause amplified or novel impacts to archaeological resources. The archaeological record includes physical features associated with human...

Person: Friggens, Loehman, Constan, Kneifel
Created Year: 2021
Type: Document

Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive...

Person: Roos, Rittenour, Swetnam, Loehman, Hollenback, Liebmann, Rosenstein
Created Year: 2020
Type: Document

Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) is an assessment intended to protect life, property, water quality, important archeological resources, and impacted ecosystems from further damage.

Person:
Created Year: 2016
Type: Document

Numbers of animal species react to the natural phenomenon of fire, but only humans have learnt to control it and to make it at will. Natural fires caused overwhelmingly by lightning are highly evident on many landscapes. Birds such as hawks, and some...

Person: Gowlett
Created Year: 2016
Type: Document

Native American populations declined between 1492 and 1900 CE, instigated by the European colonization of the Americas. However, the magnitude, tempo, and ecological effects of this depopulation remain the source of enduring debates. Recently, scholars...

Person: Liebmann, Farella, Roos, Stack, Martini, Swetnam
Created Year: 2016
Type: Document

Interannual climate variations have been important drivers of wildfire occurrence in ponderosa pine forests across western North America for at least 400 years, but at finer scales of mountain ranges and landscapes human land uses sometimes over-rode...

Person: Swetnam, Farella, Roos, Liebmann, Falk, Allen
Created Year: 2016
Type: Document

Uncharacteristically severe wildfires can threaten cultural resources through direct effects that are obvious and immediate, such as destruction of structures; or that may be harder to recognize, such as thermal alteration of surface materials....

Person: Loehman, Archer, Butler, Civitello, Dyer, Evans, Gauthier, Reardon, Steffen, Swetnam, Cates, Gordon
Created Year: 2016
Type: Project