Fire and Archaeology

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In this episode of Fire Ecology Chats, Fire Ecology editor Bob Keane talks with Megan Friggens and Rachel Loehman about results from their study that identified the environmental and climate variables that best predict observed fire severity and fire...

Person: Keane, Friggens, Loehman
Year: 2022
Type: Media

Background: Wildfires of uncharacteristic severity, a consequence of climate changes and accumulated fuels, can cause amplified or novel impacts to archaeological resources. The archaeological record includes physical features associated with human...

Person: Friggens, Loehman, Constan, Kneifel
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive...

Person: Roos, Rittenour, Swetnam, Loehman, Hollenback, Liebmann, Rosenstein
Year: 2020
Type: Document

The southwest Jemez Mountains in central New Mexico have been utilized continuously for the past 2,000 years, and by circa 1300 CE a network of large village sites and fieldhouses created a significant human footprint on this fire-prone landscape....

Person: Loehman
Year: 2016
Type: Media

The importance of fire in many western ecosystems cannot be overstated. On the Kaibab National Forest, fire provides habitat for wildlife, maintains watersheds, and supports forest health and productivity. Fire also influences a wide range of values,...

Person: Weintraub, Gonzalez, MacDonald, Gatto, Lyndon, Banks, McLaughlin, Betenson, Hercher
Year: 2015
Type: Media

Ali Reiner and Carol Ewell presented a webinar on June 10, 2014. Fire behavior and effects models are frequently used to inform fire and land management decisions despite a lack of testing against field measurements. The Adaptive Management Services...

Person: Reiner, Ewell
Year: 2014
Type: Media

While still not perfect, advancements in technology have made it possible to gather fire behavior data on actively burning wildland fires (Butler and others 2010, Jimenez and others 2007). The Adaptive Management Services Enterprise Team (AMSET: a...

Person: Vaillant, Ewell, Fites-Kaufman
Year: 2014
Type: Document

From the Conclusions ... 'Fires have impacted cultures for millennia and fire will continue to impact contemporary cultures as well as the remnants of past cultures. The challenge is to manage vagetation/fuels to minimize damage to contemporary...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee, Ryan, Koerner
Year: 2012
Type: Document

During the next few decades, a considerable portion of the productive boreal forest in Canada will be harvested and there is an excellent opportunity to use forest management activities (e.g., harvesting, regeneration, stand tending) to alter the...

Person: Engstrom, Galley, de Groot, Hirsch, Kafka, Todd
Year: 2004
Type: Document

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Person: Allen, Cartledge
Year: 1996
Type: Document