Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 74

Motivation: Rapid climate change is altering plant communities around the globe fundamentally. Despite progress in understanding how plants respond to these climate shifts, accumulating evidence suggests that disturbance could not only modify expected...

Person: Napier, Chipman
Year: 2022
Type: Document

Background: Wildfires of uncharacteristic severity, a consequence of climate changes and accumulated fuels, can cause amplified or novel impacts to archaeological resources. The archaeological record includes physical features associated with human...

Person: Friggens, Loehman, Constan, Kneifel
Year: 2021
Type: Document

The intersection of expanding human development and wildland landscapes—the “wildland–urban interface” or WUI—is one of the most vexing contexts for fire management because it involves complex interacting systems of people and nature. Here, we document...

Person: Roos, Swetnam, Ferguson, Liebmann, Loehman, Welch, Margolis, Guiterman, Hockaday, Aiuvalasit, Battillo, Farella, Kiahtipes
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive...

Person: Roos, Rittenour, Swetnam, Loehman, Hollenback, Liebmann, Rosenstein
Year: 2020
Type: Document

Paleofire studies frequently discount the impact of human activities in past fire regimes. Globally, we know that a common pattern of anthropogenic burning regimes is to burn many small patches at high frequency, thereby generating landscape...

Person: Roos, Williamson, Bowman
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Land managers are challenged to protect cultural resources within the context of reintroducing fire on the landscape. Positive relationships and partnerships are essential to effective management.

Person:
Year: 2018
Type: Media

Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) is an assessment intended to protect life, property, water quality, important archeological resources, and impacted ecosystems from further damage.

Person:
Year: 2016
Type: Document

Numbers of animal species react to the natural phenomenon of fire, but only humans have learnt to control it and to make it at will. Natural fires caused overwhelmingly by lightning are highly evident on many landscapes. Birds such as hawks, and some...

Person: Gowlett
Year: 2016
Type: Document

The southwest Jemez Mountains in central New Mexico have been utilized continuously for the past 2,000 years, and by circa 1300 CE a network of large village sites and fieldhouses created a significant human footprint on this fire-prone landscape....

Person: Loehman
Year: 2016
Type: Media

Native American populations declined between 1492 and 1900 CE, instigated by the European colonization of the Americas. However, the magnitude, tempo, and ecological effects of this depopulation remain the source of enduring debates. Recently, scholars...

Person: Liebmann, Farella, Roos, Stack, Martini, Swetnam
Year: 2016
Type: Document