Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Paleofire studies frequently discount the impact of human activities in past fire regimes. Globally, we know that a common pattern of anthropogenic burning regimes is to burn many small patches at high frequency, thereby generating landscape...

Person: Roos, Williamson, Bowman
Year: 2019
Type: Document

This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee
Year: 2012
Type: Document

Fire was arguably the most important forest and rangeland disturbance process in the Inland Northwest United States for millennia. Prior to the Lewis and Clark expedition, fire regimes ranged from high severity with return intervals of one to five...

Person: Hessburg, Agee
Year: 2003
Type: Document

From the text...'The term restoration relates to activities required to reduce hazards from wildland fires and improve federal forest and grassland health to a condition that can be maintained through periodic disturbance. Restoration and...

Person: Hardy, Keane, Harrington
Year: 1999
Type: Document

[no description entered]

Person: Biswell
Year: 1989
Type: Document