Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 62

Motivation: Rapid climate change is altering plant communities around the globe fundamentally. Despite progress in understanding how plants respond to these climate shifts, accumulating evidence suggests that disturbance could not only modify expected...

Person: Napier, Chipman
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Context

Though people have used fire to alter landscapes across North America for millennia, there remains a debate whether Native Americans altered California’s mountainous forests to create an anthropogenic landscape.

Objective

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Person: Klimaszewski-Patterson, Mensing
Year: 2020
Type: Document

Paleofire studies frequently discount the impact of human activities in past fire regimes. Globally, we know that a common pattern of anthropogenic burning regimes is to burn many small patches at high frequency, thereby generating landscape...

Person: Roos, Williamson, Bowman
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Land managers are challenged to protect cultural resources within the context of reintroducing fire on the landscape. Positive relationships and partnerships are essential to effective management.

Person:
Year: 2018
Type: Media

Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) is an assessment intended to protect life, property, water quality, important archeological resources, and impacted ecosystems from further damage.

Person:
Year: 2016
Type: Document

Numbers of animal species react to the natural phenomenon of fire, but only humans have learnt to control it and to make it at will. Natural fires caused overwhelmingly by lightning are highly evident on many landscapes. Birds such as hawks, and some...

Person: Gowlett
Year: 2016
Type: Document

The influence of Native American land-use practices on vegetation composition and structure has long been a subject of significant debate. This is particularly true in portions of the western United States where tribal hunter-gatherers did not use...

Person: Crawford, Mensing, Lake, Zimmerman
Year: 2015
Type: Document

Ali Reiner and Carol Ewell presented a webinar on June 10, 2014. Fire behavior and effects models are frequently used to inform fire and land management decisions despite a lack of testing against field measurements. The Adaptive Management Services...

Person: Reiner, Ewell
Year: 2014
Type: Media

While still not perfect, advancements in technology have made it possible to gather fire behavior data on actively burning wildland fires (Butler and others 2010, Jimenez and others 2007). The Adaptive Management Services Enterprise Team (AMSET: a...

Person: Vaillant, Ewell, Fites-Kaufman
Year: 2014
Type: Document

The purpose of this special issue is to present the findings of a collaborative, interdisciplinary eco-archaeological project that is examining evidence for indigenous landscape management practices in central coastal California in Late Holocene and...

Person: Lightfoot, Lopez
Year: 2013
Type: Document