Fire and Archaeology Resources

Displaying 61 - 70 of 275

Agro-pastoral activities in the past act as environmental legacy and have shaped the current cultural landscape in the European Alps. This study reports about prehistoric fire incidents and their impact on the flora and vegetation near the village of...

Person: Dietre, Walser, Kofler, Kothieringer, Hajdas, Lambers, Reitmaier, Haas
Created Year: 2017
Type: Document

The identification of fuel-related practices in archaeological contexts is almost always associated with the identification of fire-related structures. Charcoal analysis is the standard method of identifying wood use in the past; however, in many...

Person: Lancelotti, Ruiz-Pérez, García-Granero
Created Year: 2017
Type: Document

1. This paper addresses the origin and development of the oldest prehistoric pasture in the timberline ecotone known so far in the Alps and its relation to anthropogenic pressure and natural climate change. 2. Palaeoecological and geochemical...

Person: Pini, Ravazzi, Raiteri, Guerreschi, Castellano, Comolli
Created Year: 2017
Type: Document

Rangeland drills are commonly employed for post fire rehab and emergency stabilization. With the assumption that adverse effects will occur, archaeological sites are flagged and avoided. This may cause a site stranding effect and greater potential for...

Person: Halford
Created Year: 2017
Type: Media

Aim: To evaluate the influence of climate and Aboriginal landscape management on Holocene vegetation and fire activity. Location: Flinders Island, Bass Strait, Tasmania where archaeological data document extended periods of human presence and absence...

Person: McWethy, Haberle, Hopf, Bowman
Created Year: 2017
Type: Document

Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) is an assessment intended to protect life, property, water quality, important archeological resources, and impacted ecosystems from further damage.

Person:
Created Year: 2016
Type: Document

Numbers of animal species react to the natural phenomenon of fire, but only humans have learnt to control it and to make it at will. Natural fires caused overwhelmingly by lightning are highly evident on many landscapes. Birds such as hawks, and some...

Person: Gowlett
Created Year: 2016
Type: Document

Numbers of animal species react to the natural phenomenon of fire, but only humans have learnt to control it and to make it at will. Natural fires caused overwhelmingly by lightning are highly evident on many landscapes. Birds such as hawks, and some...

Person: Gowlett
Created Year: 2016
Type: Document

The southwest Jemez Mountains in central New Mexico have been utilized continuously for the past 2,000 years, and by circa 1300 CE a network of large village sites and fieldhouses created a significant human footprint on this fire-prone landscape....

Person: Loehman
Created Year: 2016
Type: Media

Native American populations declined between 1492 and 1900 CE, instigated by the European colonization of the Americas. However, the magnitude, tempo, and ecological effects of this depopulation remain the source of enduring debates. Recently, scholars...

Person: Liebmann, Farella, Roos, Stack, Martini, Swetnam
Created Year: 2016
Type: Document