Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 31 - 40 of 14509

Most wildland-urban interface (WUI) areas in the world will face severe wildfire risks due to climate warming and rapid urbanization. Mitigating the damage caused by WUI fires has become a worthy topic for fire researchers and managers. In recent years...

Person: Zong, Tian
Created Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire is an integral part of the Earth system, but at the same time it can pose serious threats to human society and to certain types of terrestrial ecosystems. Meteorological conditions are a key driver of wildfire activity and extent, which led to...

Person: Grillakis, Voulgarakis, Rovithakis, Seiradakis, Koutroulis, Field, Kasoar, Papadopoulos, Lazaridis
Created Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The 2020 wildfire season (May through December) in the United States was exceptionally active, with the National Interagency Fire Center reporting over 10 million acres (40,000 km2) burned. During the September 2020 wildfire events, large...

Person: Juliano, Jiménez, Kosović, Eidhammer, Thompson, Berg, Fast, Motley, Polidori
Created Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire frequency and intensity are increasing due to higher temperatures and more droughts. The distributions of fuels (vegetation in natural conditions) are also changing in response to climate change. The vegetation in cold environments such as high...

Person: Liu, Yang
Created Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In many parts of the world, wildfires have become more frequent and intense in recent decades, raising concerns about the extent to which climate change contributes to the nature of extreme fire weather occurrences. However, studies seeking to...

Person: Liu, Eden, Dieppois, Blackett
Created Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Anthropogenic climate change is now considered to be one of the main factors causing an increase in both the frequency and severity of wildfires. These fires are prone to release substantial quantities of CO2 into the atmosphere and to endanger natural...

Person: Bousquet, Mialon, Rodriguez-Fernandez, Mermoz, Kerr
Created Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Alaska has diverse boreal ecosystems across heterogeneous landscapes driven by a wide range of biological and geomorphic processes associated with disturbance and successional patterns under a changing climate. To assess historical patterns and rates...

Person: Jorgenson, Brown, Hiemstra, Genet, Marcot, Murphy, Douglas
Created Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Larger and more severe wildfires are becoming more frequent and impacting different communities and human settlements. Much of the scientific literature and media on wildfires has focused on area of ecosystems burned and numbers of structures destroyed...

Person: Thomas, Escobedo, Sloggy, Sanchez
Created Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires are among the worst natural and man-made disasters currently facing our nation. The damage a wildfire causes is multifaceted as it affects multiple areas of civilization and the safety and health of responding firefighters. Today, factors...

Person:
Created Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Emissions from biomass burning (BB) are a key source of atmospheric tracer gases that affect the atmospheric carbon cycle. We developed four sets of global BB emissions estimates (named GlcGlob, GlcGeoc, McdGlob, and McdGeoc) using a bottom-up approach...

Person: Saito, Shiraishi, Hirata, Niwa, Saito, Steinbacher, Worthy, Matsunaga
Created Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES