Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 11 - 20 of 14174

Climate change, drought, forest pest infestations, and pathogens, and high fuel loadings all factor into the expansion of territory in the United States deemed high-risk for high-intensity wildfire. Risks also mount as a decades-long demographic shift...

Person: Auer
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A detailed description is given of double burner fire whirls that are similar in structure to the type of combined whirls seen in nature. The whirls are generated using the fixed frame method, and two burners are placed symmetrically about the center...

Person: Hartl, Smits
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

As anthropogenic emissions continue to decline and emissions from landscape (wild, prescribed, and agricultural) fires increase across the coming century, the relative importance of landscape-fire smoke on air quality and health in the United States (...

Person: O'Dell, Bilsback, Ford, Martenies, Magzamen, Fischer, Pierce
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The impacts of wildfires on the health of children are becoming a more urgent matter as wildfires become more frequent, intense and affecting, not only forested areas, but also urban locations. It is important that medical professionals be prepared to...

Person: McBride
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The annual national report of the Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, presents forest health status and trends from a national or multi-State regional perspective using a variety of sources,...

Person: Potter, Conkling
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Living With Fire hosted a workshop on wildfire smoke and its potential health impacts. Featuring guests Chris Smallcomb, National Weather Service – Reno office meteorologist and public information officer, who discussed smoke forecasting and models...

Person: Smallcomb, Schnieder
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Risk management is a significant part of federal wildland fire management in the USA because policy encourages the use of fire to maintain and restore ecosystems while protecting life and property. In this study, patterns of wildfire risk were explored...

Person: Noonan, Seielstad
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The purpose of this study was to investigate the merging behavior of small-scale buoyant flames that might be representative of flames from a leaf in a shrub. Zirconia felt pads soaked in n-heptane were suspended on thin rods and spaced both...

Person: Fletcher, Haycock, Tollefsen, Lignell
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Aim

Pyrodiversity is the spatial or temporal variability in fire effects across a landscape. Multiple ecological hypotheses, when applied to the context of post-fire systems, suggest that high pyrodiversity will lead to high biodiversity. This...

Person: Jones, Tingley
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

With increasing forest and grassland wildfire trends strongly correlated to anthropogenic climate change, assessing wildfire danger is vital to reduce catastrophic human, economic, and environmental loss. From this viewpoint, the authors discuss...

Person: Sharma, Dhakal
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES