Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 1481

[From the website] Since 2002, The Firewise USA program has empowered neighbors to work together in reducing their wildfire risk. Research has shown that both the house and the adjacent landscape play a critical role in the home surviving a wildfire....

Person:
Year:
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The present work addresses the problem of how wind should be taken into account in fire spread simulations. The study was based on the software system FireStation, which incorporates a surface fire spread model and a solver for the fluid flow (Navier-...

Person: Lopes, Ribeiro, Viegas, Raposo
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Different methods can be used to measure the time and distance of travel of a fire and thus its speed. The selection of a particular method will depend on the experimental objectives, design, scale, location (in the laboratory or field), required...

Person: Gould, Sullivan, Hurley, Koul
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Collaborative approaches to natural resource management are becoming increasingly common on public lands. Negotiating a shared vision for desired conditions is a fundamental task of collaboration and serves as a foundation for developing management...

Person: Urgenson, Ryan, Halpern, Bakker, Belote, Franklin, Haugo, Nelson, Waltz
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Traditional knowledge about fire and its effects held by indigenous people, who are connected to specific landscapes, holds promise for informing contemporary fire and fuels management strategies and augmenting knowledge and information derived from...

Person: McBride, Sanchez-Trigueros, Carver, Watson, Stumpff, Matt, Borrie
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Humans use combustion for heating and cooking, managing lands, and, more recently, for fuelling the industrial economy. As a shift to fossil-fuel-based energy occurs, we expect that anthropogenic biomass burning in open landscapes will decline as it...

Person: Balch, Nagy, Archibald, Bowman, Moritz, Roos, Scott, Williamson
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Mega-fires are often defined according to their size and intensity but are more accurately described by their socioeconomic impacts. Three factors -- climate change, fire exclusion, and antecedent disturbance, collectively referred to as the 'mega...

Person: Stephens, Burrows, Buyantuyev, Gray, Keane, Kubian, Liu, Seijo, Shu, Tolhurst, van Wagtendonk
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fuel consumption specifies the amount of vegetative biomass consumed during wildland fire. It is a two-stage process of pyrolysis and combustion that occurs simultaneously and at different rates depending on the characteristics and condition of the...

Person: Ottmar
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the introduction ... 'Announcing the release of new software packages for application in wildland fire science and management, two fields that are already fully saturated with computer technology, may seem a bit too much to many managers....

Person: Keane, Dillon, Drury, Innes, Morgan, Lutes, Prichard, Smith, Strand
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Wich is best: bury, burn or both? The extraordinary heterogeneity of the energy system makes it unlikely that any single solution will triumph everywhere. In practice, there will be no absolute dominance of any one strategy over...

Person: Keith, Rhodes
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS