Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 1526

Smoke exposure data among U.S. wildland firefighters for carbon monoxide, respirable particulate and respirable crystalline silica are presented from a field surveillance program between 2009 and 2012. Models to predict fireline-average exposure to...

Person: Reinhardt, Broyles
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires are extremely destructive disasters that cause significant loss of lives, forest cover and wildlife. This is due to their uncontrolled, erratic, rapid spread and behaviour. The incidence of wildfires is expected to increase worldwide because...

Person: Kaur, Sood
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

With increases in the severity and duration of fire seasons, wildland firefighters are working longer shifts all across the west and are experiencing increased fatigue. In this webinar, Randy Brooks presented results from a survey of more than 400...

Person: Keville
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Wildland firefighters working in remote environments with steep terrain, uneven ground, variable temperatures and fluctuating elevations cultivate injury risk. The purpose of this study was to understand types of injuries and illnesses wildland...

Person: Moody, Purchio, Palmer
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A decade ago, the Global Fire Monitoring Center (GFMC) published its first collection of articles in Fire Management Today to establish a greater awareness of international fire management. With this issue, our intent remains the same. The preceding...

Person: Pronto, Karns
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

My first visit to the Global Fire Monitoring Center (GFMC) was disorienting. As I walked through the entryway, I was hit with the familiar aroma of burnt vegetation. Nearby, well-used wildland turnouts hung above boxes of fusees. Radios capable of...

Person: Karns
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Like many before it, the wildfire was conceived on a late summer afternoon as a drifting monsoonal cell bunched up, gathered its energy, and raked over the mountainous uplift, all the while spewing hard rain, wind, and lightning. The neighborhood it...

Person: Fillmore
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Firewise USA™ national recognition program evolved from a 1986 cooperative agreement between the Forest Service and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). The agreement enabled NFPA, as a national nonprofit safety organization with an...

Person: Prudhomme
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

For the last 100 years, fire suppression policies have largely kept fire from playing its natural role. Removing fire from ecosystems that depend on it to stay healthy, coupled with more people building houses in flammable natural areas, has created a...

Person: Medley-Daniel
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire mitigation can improve the chances of a home surviving a wildfire. Research has shown that one of the most important sources of information that prompts residents in the wildland-urban interface (WUI) to take action to reduce their wildfire...

Person: Shirley
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES