Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 1221

The Landscape Burn Probability Model quantifies the likelihood and intensity of a fire occurring under a fixed set of weather and fuel moisture conditions. It is one of the key pieces to conducting an Exposure Analysis which contributes to a...

Person: Bastian
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate and disturbance regimes are expected to change profoundly in 21st century forests. Whether and where forests may succumb to projected trends and shift to different ecosystem states is poorly resolved but essential for anticipating both...

Person: Hansen
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

A short video walk-through outlining how to run the Landscape Burn Probability (LBP) model in IFTDSS.

Person:
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire is common and widespread in Alaskan tundra. Tundra fires exert considerable influence on local ecosystem functioning and contribute to climate change through biogeochemical (e.g. carbon cycle) and biogeophysical (e.g. albedo) effects....

Person: He, Loboda, Jenkins, Chen
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Recently, global climate change discussions have become more prominent, and forests are considered as the ecosystems most at risk by the consequences of climate change. Wildfires are among one of the main drivers leading to losses in forested areas....

Person: Ghorbanzadeh, Kamran, Blaschke, Aryal, Naboureh, Einali, Bian
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We’ve spent 100 years growing a tinderbox across the West. Now it's wildfire season. Controlled burning - an indigenous tradition that's been used for millennia - might be a solution.

Person:
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Paleofire studies frequently discount the impact of human activities in past fire regimes. Globally, we know that a common pattern of anthropogenic burning regimes is to burn many small patches at high frequency, thereby generating landscape...

Person: Roos, Williamson, Bowman
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Forest fires threaten a large part of the world's forests, communities, and industrial plants, triggering technological accidents (Natechs). Forest fire modelling with respect to contributing spatial parameters is one of the well-known ways not only to...

Person: Naderpour, Rizeei, Khakzad, Pradhan
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires are extremely destructive disasters that cause significant loss of lives, forest cover and wildlife. This is due to their uncontrolled, erratic, rapid spread and behaviour. The incidence of wildfires is expected to increase worldwide because...

Person: Kaur, Sood
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire is an important disturbance to Arctic tundra ecosystems. In the coming decades, tundra fire frequency, intensity, and extent are projected to increase because of anthropogenic climate change. To more accurately predict the effects of climate...

Person: Sae-Lim, Russell, Vachula, Holmes, Mann, Schade, Natali
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES