Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 1503

Wildfire is an important disturbance to Arctic tundra ecosystems. In the coming decades, tundra fire frequency, intensity, and extent are projected to increase because of anthropogenic climate change. To more accurately predict the effects of climate...

Person: Sae-Lim, Russell, Vachula, Holmes, Mann, Schade, Natali
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Earth has experienced large changes in global and regional climates over the past one million years. Understanding processes and feedbacks that control those past environmental changes is of great interest for better understanding the nature,...

Person: Daniau, Desprat, Aleman, Bremond, Davis, Fletcher, Marlon, Marquer, Montade, Morales-Molino, Naughton, Rius, Urrego
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

There is wide agreement that prescribed fire is essential and under-utilized for restoring and maintaining natural ecosystem function, sustaining native wildlife populations, and mitigating wildfire hazard. There is less agreement on the history of...

Person: Robertson
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Analyses of bulk petrographic data indicate that during the Late Paleozoic wildfires were more prevalent than at present. We propose that the development of fire systems through this interval was controlled predominantly by the elevated atmospheric...

Person: Glasspool, Scott, Waltham, Pronina, Shao
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The idea for a book series began in conversations with Lincoln Bramwell, chief historian for the Forest Service. We agreed that the standard history Fire in America needed updating.

Person: Pyne
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is a necessary ecosystem process in many biomes and is best viewed as a natural disturbance that is beneficial to ecosystem functioning. However, increasingly, we are seeing human interference in fire regimes that alters the historical range of...

Person: Keeley, Pausas
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Presented By: Mike Smith and Caleb Tomlinson

March 27th, 2019. Part of the Alaska Fire Science Consortium workshop, the presentation gave an overview on the Fire Management in the Yukon Territory.

Person: Tomlinson, Smith
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

This agreement is made and entered into by the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Joint Fire Science Program (BLM), and the University of Nevada Reno for the purpose of Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Joint Fire Science Program...

Person: Singletary, Evans
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

In many ecosystems worldwide, fire plays a critical role as a natural disturbance that influences landscape pattern and function. The effects of fire disturbances at landscape levels are central to many tribal cultures in North America, and tribes...

Person: Lopez, Frederick, Lake, Wright
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Longleaf pine and ponderosa pine in the same talk? Both of these forests were often described as open and park-like. This presentation will provide a historical overview of these forests and a discussion of each species ecology and the relationship...

Person: Kush
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES