Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 81 - 90 of 6195

Fire refugia are landscape elements that remain unburned or minimally affected by fire, thereby supporting postfire ecosystem function, biodiversity, and resilience to disturbances. Although fire refugia have been studied across continents, scales, and...

Person: Meddens, Kolden, Lutz, Smith, Cansler, Abatzoglou, Meigs , Downing, Krawchuk
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Although wildfires are increasing globally, available information on how mammals respond behaviourally and physiologically to fires is scant. Despite a large number of ecological studies, often examining animal diversity and abundance before and after...

Person: Geiser, Stawski, Doty, Cooper, Nowack
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The fires that ravaged Yellowstone National Park in 1988 were large and severe, but they were still within the normal limits of fire regimes in the West. Following those fires 30 years ago, University of Wisconsin–Madison Professor of Integrative...

Person:
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Global fire regimes are shifting due to climate and land use changes. Understanding the responses of belowground communities to fire is key to predicting changes in the ecosystem processes they regulate. We conducted a comprehensive meta‐analysis of...

Person: Pressler, Moore, Cotrufo
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Conserving animals and plants in fire-prone landscapes requires evidence of how fires affect modified ecosystems. Despite progress on this front, fire ecology is restricted by a dissonance between two dominant paradigms: ‘fire mosaics’ and ‘functional...

Person: Kelly, Brotons, Giljohann, McCarthy, Pausas, Smith
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Changes in fire frequency, size, and severity are driving ecological transformations in many systems. In arid and semi-arid regions that are adapted to fire, long-term fire exclusion by managers leads to declines in fire frequency, altered fire size...

Person: Aslan, Samberg, Dickson, Gray
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Watch a serotinous Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine cone heat up and open.

Person:
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Many of the most pressing threats to forests result from complex interactions between multiple stressors and require management on large spatial and temporal scales. For this reason, many ecosystem managers have begun to recognize the need to consider...

Person: Fischer
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The long history of fire in North America spans millennia and is recognized as an important driver in the widespread and long-term dominance of oak species and oak natural communities. Frequent wildfires from about 1850 to 1950 resulted in much forest...

Person: Dey, Schweitzer
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

As forests grow, the trees absorb CO2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and store it within their growing biomass (trunk, branches, leaves and root systems). A “forest carbon offset,” is a metric ton of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e)—the...

Person: Lojewski
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES