Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 197

We used the TELSA forest landscape model to examine the long-term consequences of applying different forest management scenarios on indicators of wildlife habitat, understory productivity, crown fuel hazard, timber yield and treatment costs. The study...

Person: Klenner, Walton
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

LANDFIRE is a 5-year, multipartner project producing consistent and comprehensive maps and data describing vegetation, wildland fuel, fire regimes and ecological departure from historical conditions across the United States. It is a shared project...

Person: Rollins
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Uncertainty is a dominant feature of decision making in forestry and wildlife management. Aggravating this challenge is the irreversibility of some decisions, resulting in the loss of economic opportunities or the extirpation of wildlife populations....

Person: Morgan, Ben, Lasserre
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The USDA Forest Service stores fire occurrence data in a relational data base for planning, analysis, and other purposes. Weather observations are stored in the same data base for all five federal land management agencies and some state wildland...

Person: Vasievich, Fried, Leefers, Bunton
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

How do we organize for high performance in a setting where the potential for error and disaster can be overwhelming? In doing so, how can we best apply the High Reliability Organizing concepts into the prescribed fire and fire use arenas? And, to...

Person: Keller, Weick, Sutcliffe, Saveland, Lahey, Thomas, Nasiatka
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'The 1988 Yellowstone Fire controversy caused the USDA Forest Service to evaluate the risks and benefits of its wildland fire use program.... After the National Fire Plan was initiated, a significant increase in wildland fire use...

Person: Sexton
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Martell
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Allen, Cartledge
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We developed multiple regression models and tree-based (CART -- classification and regression tree) models to predict fire return intervals across the Interior Columbia River basin at 1-km resolution, using geo-referenced fire history potential...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, McKenzie, Peterson, Agee
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Idaho Panhandle National Forests (IPNF), in partnership with the University of Idaho, the Fire Sciences Laboratory, and The Sampson Group, developed a Geographic Information System (GIS) based wildfire hazard-risk assessment. The assessment was...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Harkins, Morgan, Neuenschwander, Chrisman, Zack, Jacobson, Grant, Sampson
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS