Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 774

Climate change has increased the occurrence, severity, and impact of disturbances on forested ecosystems worldwide, resulting in a need to identify factors that contribute to an ecosystem's resilience or capacity to recover from disturbance....

Person: Walker, Mack, Johnstone
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed fire is widely accepted as a conservation tool because fire is essential to the maintenance of native biodiversity in many terrestrial communities. Approaches to this land-management technique vary greatly among continents, and sharing...

Person: Freeman, Kobziar, Rose, Cropper
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal forests are critical sinks in the global carbon cycle. However, recent studies have revealed increasing frequency and extent of wildfires, decreasing landscape greenness, increasing tree mortality and declining growth of black and white spruce...

Person: Sullivan, Pattison, Brownlee, Cahoon, Hollingsworth
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfires are a common disturbance event in the Canadian boreal forest. Within event boundaries, the level of vegetation mortality varies greatly. Understanding where surviving vegetation occurs within fire events and how this relates to pre-fire...

Person: Ferster, Eskelson, Andison, LeMay
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Understanding species diversity and disturbance relationships is important for biodiversity conservation in disturbance-driven boreal forests. Species richness and evenness may respond differently with stand development following fire. Furthermore, few...

Person: Yeboah, Chen, Kingston
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal fires have immediate effects on regional carbon budgets by emitting CO2 into the atmosphere at the time of burning, but they also have legacy effects by initiating a long-term carbon sink during post-fire vegetation recovery. Quantifying these...

Person: Yue, Ciais, Zhu, Wang, Peng, Piao
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The boreal forest of Alaska has experienced a small area of forest cuttings, amounting to 7137 ha out of a total of 256,284 ha of timberland in the Fairbanks and Kantishna area of state forest land. Low product values and high costs for management have...

Person: Morimoto, Juday, Young
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The location, timing, spatial extent, and frequency of wildfires are changing rapidly in many parts of the world, producing substantial impacts on ecosystems, people, and potentially climate. Paleofire records based on charcoal accumulation in...

Person: Marlon, Kelly, Daniau, Vannière, Power, Bartlein, Higuera, Blarquez, Brewer, Brücher, Feurdean, Gil-Romera, Iglesias, Maezumi, Magi, Courtney Mustaphi, Zhihai
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Humans use combustion for heating and cooking, managing lands, and, more recently, for fuelling the industrial economy. As a shift to fossil-fuel-based energy occurs, we expect that anthropogenic biomass burning in open landscapes will decline as it...

Person: Balch, Nagy, Archibald, Bowman, Moritz, Roos, Scott, Williamson
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A spatially explicit baseline measure of historic, current and future wildfire ignition expectations is required to monitor and understand changes in fire occurrence, the distribution of which climate change is anticipated to modify. Using spatial-...

Person: Gralewicz, Nelson, Wulder
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS