Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Natural fires annually decimate up to 1% of the forested area in the boreal region of Quebec, and represent a major structuring force in the region, creating a mosaic of watersheds characterized by large variations in vegetation structure and...

Person: Marchand, Prairie, Del Giorgio
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The impact of forest fire in 1997 and 1998 on the mycorrhzae was studied at the dipterocarp forest in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. In unaffected forest more than half of total ectomycorrhizae distributed in the organic layer but in the fire-affected...

Person: Akema, Nurhiftisni, Suciatmih, Simbolon
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text (p.243) ... 'Evaluating the potential of various survey techniques to detect and adequately monitor Northern Hawk Owls [Surnia ulula] is a fundamental first step in improving our knowledge of this species. It is unlikely that...

Person: Hannah
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Salvage logging, the removal for profit of standing trees that have been damaged by extensive wildfires, has been quite controversial and subject to lawsuits that can delay the logging past the time in which the lumber is still useful. It has not been...

Person: Ryon, Hamin
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Human-induced vegetation fires destroy a large amount of biomass each year and thus constitute an important fraction of the human interference with the energy flows of terrestrial ecosystems. This paper presents a quantification of the biomass burned...

Person: Lauk, Erb
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Fire is a worldwide phenomenon that appears in the geological record soon after the appearance of terrestrial plants. Fire influences global ecosystem patterns and processes, including vegetation distribution and structure, the carbon cycle, and...

Person: Bowman, Balch, Artaxo, Bond, Carlson, Cochrane, D'Antonio, DeFries, Doyle, Harrison, Johnston, Keeley, Krawchuk, Kull, Marston, Moritz, Prentice, Roos, Scott, Swetnam, Van der Werf, Pyne
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

It is widely accepted that for many North American forest ecosystems, changes in species composition and structure are associated with departures from natural disturbance regimes (e.g., fire exclusion). It also widely accepted that restoration of...

Person: Long
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Prescribed burning may be conducted at times of the year when fires were infrequent historically, leading to concerns about potential adverse effects on vegetation and wildlife. Historical and prescribed fire regimes for different regions in the...

Person: Knapp, Estes, Skinner
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS