Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 46

Boreal forest fires emit large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere primarily through the combustion of soil organic matter1,2,3. During each fire, a portion of this soil beneath the burned layer can escape combustion, leading to a net accumulation of...

Person: Walker, Baltzer, Cumming, Day, Ebert, Goetz, Johnstone, Potter, Rogers, Schuur, Turetsky, Mack
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

High-latitude regions have experienced rapid warming in recent decades, and this trend is projected to continue over the twenty-first century1. Fire is also projected to increase with warming2,3. We show here, consistent with changes during the...

Person: Mekonnen, Riley, Randerson, Grant, Rogers
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Context: Fire and controlled grazing have been widely adopted as management interventions to counteract woody shrub proliferation in many arid and semiarid grassland systems. The actual intensity of grazing and fire, along with the timing of the...

Person: Wang, Li, Ravi
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Invasive plants vary in their sensitivity to fire during the invasion process. Some species are sensitive to fire management at all stages. Both seeds and non-sprouting adult plants experience high mortality after fire such that the species is unable...

Person: Fill, Crandall
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In 1998, the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) was statutorily authorized as a joint partnership between the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service. The program provides leadership to the wildland fire...

Person: Gucker
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Carrie Allison's (US Fish and Wildlife Service) presentation to the 2019 Fire in Eastern Oak Forests Conference in State College, PA.

Person: Allison
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Charles Ruffner's (Southern Illinois University) presentation to the 2019 Fire in Eastern Oak Forests Conference in State College, PA

Person: Ruffner
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Ben Jones' (Ruffed Grouse Society) presentation to the 2019 Fire in Eastern Oak Forests Conference in State College, PA.

Person: Jones
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

High latitude regions are warming rapidly with important ecological and societal consequences. Utilizing two landscape‐scale data sets from interior Alaska, we compared patterns in forest structure in two regions with differing fire disturbance,...

Person: Roland, Schmidt, Winder, Stehn, Nicklen
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Background: Fire has historically been a primary control on succession and vegetation dynamics in boreal systems, although modern changing climate is potentially increasing fire size and frequency. Large, often remote fires necessitate large-scale...

Person: Hammond, Strand, Hudak, Newingham
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES