Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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The National Park Service (NPS) manages non-native invasive plant species that impact the natural and cultural resources and visitor experience in parks. This document provides an overview of key technical concepts and critical information needed to...

Person: Dingman, Abella, Frey, Budde, Hogan
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the Alaska Climate Change Adaption Series.

Wildfires are a natural part of the boreal ecosystem. Wildfires help maintain vegetation diversity, providing suitable habitats for wildlife, but wildfires can also present a threat to human values...

Person:
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This agreement is made and entered into by the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Joint Fire Science Program (BLM), and the University of Nevada Reno for the purpose of Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Joint Fire Science Program...

Person: Singletary, Evans
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Common practices for invasive species control and management include physical, chemical, and biological approaches. The first two approaches have clear limitations and may lead to unintended (negative) consequences, unless carefully planned and...

Person: Guo, Brockway, Larson, Wang, Ren
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Some forest managers have had concerns that prescribed burning after drought will stress mature pines, and increase their susceptibility to beetle attack. However, this concern resulted in many missed opportunities for applying fire after a recent...

Person: Coyle
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Fire is the dominant ecological disturbance process in boreal forests (coniferous forests consisting mostly of pines, spruces, and larches) and fire frequency, size and severity are increasing in Alaska owing to climate warming. However, interactions...

Person: Falke, Gray
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Some have wondered whether the 2017 Montana fre season was a rare apocalypse or whether it was simply Nature being Nature. The short answer is, some of both. Today’s forests clearly are experiencing a highly active fre period, one of many during the...

Person: Barrett
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The incidence and degree of stand disturbance (that is, from fre, insects, and disease) are driving excess tree mortality in the Western United States. Hot and dry conditions associated with drought have stressed forests over a wide geographic area,...

Person: Briggs
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

First in a three-part video series describing the work and cutting edge risk management tools developed by the Rocky Mountain Research Station Wildfire Risk Management Science Team. The Team works with National Forests and other fire managers to plan...

Person:
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Presented by Jill Johnstone at the 2018 Alaska Fire Science Consortium Spring Fire Science Workshop.

Person: Johnstone
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES