Skip to main content

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

Displaying 601 - 625 of 14911

Sullivan, Jones, Troutwine, Krueger, Zuuring, Meneghin
MAGIS eXpress is a modeling system for spatially-explicit analysis of timber harvest scheduling and access management. GIS (Geographic Information System) layers are imported and used as the basis for formulating harvest and access models. Access issues that can be addressed…
Year: 2004
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Keane, Drury, Karau, Hessburg, Reynolds
This paper presents modeling methods for mapping fire hazard and fire risk using a research model called FIREHARM (FIRE Hazard and Risk Model) that computes common measures of fire behavior, fire danger, and fire effects to spatially portray fire hazard over space. FIREHARM can…
Year: 2010
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Scott
Quantitative scales of fire magnitude and intensity are needed to assess and publicly communicate the unbiased potential of wildland fire to cause effects-harm, damage, and ecological change. Such scales already exist for earthquakes (Richter Scale and Mercalli Scale),…
Year: 2006
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Zimmerman, Hilbruner, Werth, Sexton, Bartlette
The 1998 wildland fire season presented conditions favoring increased wildland fire numbers and rapid expansion of area affected. This situation posed complex issues to all wildland fire management agencies in terms of firefighting resource availability, allocation, and long-…
Year: 2000
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Forthofer
The Rapid Data Delivery System (RDDS) (formerly called 'Fire Data Ordering') from the USGS is an interactive web based GIS tool useful for downloading the DEM files required for use in WindNinja and WindWizard. The tool allows users to zoom into the desired area and extract a…
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

McHugh
Documents the steps taken to input WindWizard generated gridded wind direction into ArcView 3.2x.
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

McHugh
Documents the steps taken to input WindWizard generated gridded wind direction into ArcMap 8.3.
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Forthofer, Shannon, Butler
WindNinja is a simple diagnostic model designed for simulating microscale, terrain-influenced winds. A recent addition to WindNinja is a diurnal slope flow model. The model uses sensible surface heat flux, distance to ridge top or valley bottom, slope steepness, and surface and…
Year: 2009
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Turner, Ollinger, Kimball
A growing body of research has demonstrated the complementary nature of remote sensing and ecosystem modeling in studies of terrestrial carbon cycling. Whereas remote sensing instruments are designed to capture spatially continuous information on the reflectance properties of…
Year: 2004
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Winter, Bigler-Cole
A user needs assessment surrounding National Predictive Services was conducted involving current and prospective customers. Needs assessments (Rossi, Freeman and Lipsey 1999) are a useful form of program evaluation. National Predictive Services offers products and services…
Year: 2006
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Countryman
The way that a wildland fire burns and behaves, and the difficulty of controlling it, are closely related to the manner and rate of heat transfer. The speed with which fire spreads, for example, depends greatly on how quickly sufficient heat for ignition can be transferred to…
Year: 1978
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Countryman
Wildland fire involves both chemical and physical processes. In the burning of wildland fuel burns, their stored chemical energy is converted to thermal energy or heat through a series of complex chemical reactions. But for the combustion process to be started, heat must be…
Year: 1977
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Countryman
Heat transfer is of paramount importance in wildland fire behavior and control. For a fire to start, heat must be transferred from a firebrand to the fuel. If the fire is to continue to burn and spread, heat must be transferred to the unburned fuel around the fire. And…
Year: 1977
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Countryman
Three ingredients are essential for a wildland fire to start and to burn. First, there must be burnable fuel available. Then enough heat must be applied to the fuel to raise its temperature to the ignition point. And finally, there must be enough air to supply oxygen needed to…
Year: 1977
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Countryman
Before a wildland fire can start, heat must be transferred from a firebrand to the fuel. Then heat must be transferred from the fuel surface to deeper layers if the fire is to continue to burn. Finally, heat must be transferred to surrounding unburned fuel if the fire is to…
Year: 1976
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Countryman
Wildland fire is dependent on heat transfer. For a fire to start, heat must be transferred from a firebrand to the fuel. If the fire is to burn and grow, heat transfer to the unburned fuel around the fire must continue. The way a fire burns and behaves is closely related to the…
Year: 1976
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Countryman
Heat, or thermal energy, is one of the three ingredients essential to fire-the other two are oxygen and fuel. Enough oxygen for fire is almost always available in wildlands, and fuel is usually plentiful. But the mere presence of a heat source does not necessarily result in a…
Year: 1976
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Countryman
Three ingredients are essential for a wildland fire to start and to burn. First, there must be burnable fuel available. Then enough heat must be applied to the fuel to raise its temperature to the ignition point. And finally, there must be enough air to supply oxygen needed to…
Year: 1975
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Countryman
Experience with wildland fires soon teaches that no two are exactly alike. Fire behavior is not an independent phenomenon-it is the product of the environment in which the fire is burning. Environment has been defined as 'surrounding conditions, influences, and forces that…
Year: 1972
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Countryman
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a highly toxic, nonirritating gas. One of the products of combustion, it is invisible, odorless, tasteless, and slightly lighter than air. But smoke, another combustion product, is visible. And when smoke is present, it is highly likely that CO and other…
Year: 1971
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Countryman
'If it hadn't been for that damn fire whirl we would have caught it at 5 acres,' yelled the fire boss to his assistant as they watched the fire crews mop up the final smoldering spots in a 250-acre brush fire. The fire had been contained at about 5 acres, and the crew had just…
Year: 1971
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Countryman
'Humidity' is an eight-letter word that is heard around fire camps and on the fireline almost as often as the more widely known four-letter words. Most firefighters know that humidity has something to do with moisture in the air. If it is low, they expect difficulty in…
Year: 1971
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

WARNING: this is a historical document, and some of the content may be considered offensive many years later. If you read it, please consider the times and spirit in which it was written. It is suspected that it was developed during the World War II era because…
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Burgan, Susott
If your Texas Instruments TI-59 is nearing its last gasp, you can replace it with a newer calculator and enjoy the use of improved fire danger and fire behavior programs. The Hewlett-Packard HP-71B handheld calculator has been selected to replace the TI-59 and is now available…
Year: 1986
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Burgan
A fire danger/fire behavior Custom Read Only Memory (CROM) has been developed for the Texas Instruments model 59 hand held calculator. It can be used to compute both 1978 National Fire Danger Rating indexes and components and several variables used to estimate wildfire behavior…
Year: 1979
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES