Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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1 Areas burned annually in the United States between 1700 and 1990 were derived from published estimates of pre-European burning rates and from wildfire statistics of the US Forest Service. Changes in live and dead vegetation following fire and fire...

Person: Houghton, Hackler, Lawrence
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A comprehensive investigation of Canadian boreal forest fires was conducted using NOAA-AVHRR imagery. Algorithms were developed to (1) detect active forest fires, (2) map burned areas on daily and annual basis, and (3) estimate fire emissions based on...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Li, Jin, Fraser
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The revision of FOFEM, a national fire effects model, is described. FOFEM 5.0 will incorporate the predictions of fuel consumption, tree mortality and smoke production along with the addition of soil heating and an updated user interface. The revised...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Reinhardt, Mincemoyer, Keane
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The workshop began with the workshop facilitator, Neil Sampson, summarizing 17 invited papers presented on the opening day of the conference. These papers provided a state-of-the-science overview of pre-selected topics including Overview (3 papers),...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Sampson, Gollberg
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Understanding the trade-off between short-term and long-term consequences of fire impacts on ecosystems is needed before a comprehensive fuels management program can be implemented nationally. We are comparing three vegetation models that may be used...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Weise, Kimberlin, Arbaugh, Chew, Jones, Merzenich, van Wagtendonk, Wiitala
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Smoke may present the most intractable barrier of all to implementing more enlightened fire management. The benefits of a prescribed fire program can only be realized if the public and regulatory agencies agree that the air quality impacts are...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Yokelson, Goode, Ward, Baker, Susott, Hao
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A GIS-based method has been developed for mapping weather-dependent fire danger index under the Mission to Planet Earth Program. This method uses information provided by AVHRR and TOVS instruments installed in NOAA satellites. The radiometric NOAA fire...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Sukhinin, Cahoon, Stocks
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Gorte
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Removing American Indians from the land effectively ended wildland burning practices that had lasted for millennia. ...The Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management together administer several hundred million acres of...

Person: Williams
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Preface...'Three factors provided the impetus for holding this conference and workshop. First, wildland fire managers are tasked with increasing the emphasis on prescribed fire and other fuel management techniques as part of an effort to...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS