Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

The following list of fire research topics and questions were generated by personnel from agencies and organizations within AWFCG during 2014 Fall Fire Review and through other solicitations. The topics were initially ranked by the AWFCG Fire Research...

Person: York
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the text (p. 34) ... 'Given the fact that climate change will cause many wildfires to burn larger and longer, the real issue in the near future will not be cost reduction or even cost containment, but rather, cost management. Expenditures may...

Person: Ingalsbee
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Executive Summary: On August 8, 2000, President Clinton asked Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt and Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman to prepare a report that recommends how best to respond to this year*s severe fires, reduce the impacts of these...

Person:
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Aware of the time lag that frequently exists between declines in biodiversity and effective conservation to correct and reverse the declines, I examine some reasons behind this problem. Experience with species as diverse as the shag (Phalacrocorax...

Person: Brennan, Palmer, Burger, Pruden, Potts
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[From description] Earth is the only planet known to have fire. The reason is both simple and profound: fire exists because Earth is the only planet to possess life as we know it. Fire is an expression of life on Earth and an index of life's...

Person: Scott, Bowman, Bond, Pyne, Alexander
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire management in the United States is caught in a rigidity trap, an inability to apply novelty and innovation in the midst of crisis. Despite wide recognition that public agencies should engage in ecological fire restoration, fire...

Person: Butler, Goldstein
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fires affect animals mainly through effects on their habitat. Fires often cause short-term increases in wildlife foods that contribute to increases in populations of some animals. These increases are moderated by the animals' ability to thrive in...

Person: Smith, Smith, Schreiner, Telfer, Hooper, Huff, Lyon
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS