Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 101

America does not have a fire problem. It has many fire problems. The policy of fire exclusion through most of the 20th century seemed successful at first but eventually lead to larger, more intense, and damaging fires. By the mid-1970s federal agencies...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the text ... 'It may be that a new dialogue is needed between those who advocate education and social sciences investigations on fire and those who advocate air quality and health science concerned with fire smoke.'

Person: Riebau, Fox
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In forests, termites serve as ''soil engineers,'' translocating mineral soil to the surface, constructing macropores to improve water infiltration, increase soil minerals and organic carbon, facilitate the growth of microbes and...

Person: Peterson
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The economic costs of adverse health effects associated with exposure to wildfire smoke should be given serious consideration in determining the optimal wildfire management policy. Unfortunately, the literature in this research area is thin. In an...

Person: Kochi, Donovan, Champ, Loomis
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

From the text ... 'The Wildland Fire Decision Support System (WFDSS) is a new Web-based system designed to integrate science and technology in support of risk-informed decisionmaking for wildland fires. ... WFDSS replaces three past wildland fire...

Person: Larkin, Brown, Lahm, Zimmerman
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'As the only agency managing lands in all 50 states and every U.S. territory, the FWS [Fish and Wildlife Service] manages fire on the greatest number of units with the smallest fire budget of any federal agency.'

Person: Gleason
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed burning is a commonly advocated and historical practice for control of woody species encroachment into grasslands on all continents. However, desert grasslands of the southwestern United States often lack needed herbaceous fuel loads for...

Person: Havstad, James
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... ''Fire is fire' is a familiar catch-phrase in the fire management community, recognizing that fire is both a tool and a process that shapes the landscape. Today, National Park Service managers use the goals and...

Person: D'Amico, Halainen
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

To fully understand the carbon (C) cycle impacts of forest fires, both C emissions during the fire and post-disturbance fluxes need to be considered. The latter are dominated by soil surface CO2 flux (Fs), which is still subject to large uncertainties...

Person: Smith, Kaduk, Baltzer, Wooster, Mottram, Hartley, Lynham, Studens, Curry, Stocks
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Historically, fires occurred throughout the year in the Fescue Prairie of Canada, but little is known about plant community responses to burning at different times of the year. Composition of plant communities was determined annually for 6 years after...

Person: Gross, Romo
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS