Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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From the Summary (p.343-344) ... 'Radar imagery is an important source of data for monitoring specific processes and surface characteristics in boreal forests. As with other sources of remotely sensed data, radar imagery can efficiently provide...

Person: Kasischke, Stocks, Kasischke, BourgeauChavez, French, Harrell
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Stroppiana, Pinnock, Gregoire
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Idaho Panhandle National Forests (IPNF), in partnership with the University of Idaho, the Fire Sciences Laboratory, and The Sampson Group, developed a Geographic Information System (GIS) based wildfire hazard-risk assessment. The assessment was...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Harkins, Morgan, Neuenschwander, Chrisman, Zack, Jacobson, Grant, Sampson
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fuel input layers for the FARSITE fire growth model were created for all lands in and around the Gila National Forest, New Mexico, using satellite imagery, terrain modeling, and biophysical simulation. FARSITE is a spatially explicit fire growth model...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Keane, Mincemoyer, Schmidt, Garner
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Gorte
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Knowledge of temporal changes in the area burned by wildfires is required to understand their influence on global climate change. This paper reviews the primary methods of reconstructing and measuring area burned. The area burned by wildfires is...

Person: Innes, Verstraete, Larsen
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire has been an integral part of the conterminous United States' ecological landscape for millennia. Today wildland fire has to compete with other socially desirable goals for a share of a limited air resource. New ozone, particulate,...

Person: Leenhouts
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fires are not spatially uniform events. They result in a complicated mosaic of burned and unburned vegetation. To manage fuel loads and the associated fire hazard it is essential to improve our understanding of the spatial patterns of the...

Person: Medler
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Cerro Grande has been called the biggest fire in New Mexico history. The Cerro Grande blaze raged across the hillsides above Los Alamos National Laboratory, then, driven by high winds, the fire raced through the Laboratory and the Los Alamos town...

Person: Mullen
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The fire season of 2000 is one of the most severe on record, burning approximately seven million acres by the end of September—over 2.5 times the 10-year average of 2.6 million acres. Fires burning in the wildland-urban interface have resulted in...

Person: Hesseln, Rideout
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS