Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 21

Fire, competition for light and water, and native forest pests have interacted for millennia in western forests to produce a countryside dominated by seral species of conifers. These conifer-dominated ecosystems exist in six kinds of biotic communities...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, McDonald, Harvey, Tonn
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'I think we'll be utilizing fire a lot more than we have in the past in order to bring our ecosystems back into balance. ... FIRE 21 will help the Forest Service reach the desired future condition for our national forests by...

Person: Cruz
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'The fires that once flushed the myriad landscapes of North America were fires that people once set and no longer do. ...The aboriginal firestick became a lever that, suitably sited, could move whole landscapes, even continents...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Removing American Indians from the land effectively ended wildland burning practices that had lasted for millennia. ...The Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management together administer several hundred million acres of...

Person: Williams
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Brockway
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

It is now apparent that fire once played some role in shaping all but the wettest, the most arid, or the most fire-sheltered plant communities of the United States. Understanding the role of fire in structuring vegetation is critical for land...

Person: Frost, Frost
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper outlines a broad and flexible framework for ecological restoration of Southwestern ponderosa pine forests, supporting a diverse range of scientifically viable restoration approaches. Ponderosa pine forests in the region have been radically...

Person: Allen, Falk, Hoffman, Klingel, Morgan, Savage, Schulke, Stacey, Suckling, Swetnam
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire can be used not only to protect forest ecosystems but also as a restoration tool. However, a successful application of fire requires knowing in advance the potential fire behavior (e.g., rate of spread and intensity). Without this information...

Person: Flores, Omi
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire is a critical disturbance process in determining the structure and distribution of the boreal forest. Fire in the boreal forest typically replaces most of the dominant vegetation cover, liberates substantial carbon and other elements to the...

Person: Sandberg
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Two very different vegetation types characterize the deserts of North America. Shrublands are typical of the Great Basin, Mojave, and Sonoran deserts. Perennial grasslands are most prevalent in the Chihuahuan Desert. Historically, fires were generally...

Person: Brooks, Pyke
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS