Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 145

From the text ... 'Computer-driven prediction models of post-fire soil erosion can aid site prioritization for erosion control measures....... Fire and site characterization by fire crews during suppression efforts could provide information to...

Person: Godson, Stednick
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'It may be that a new dialogue is needed between those who advocate education and social sciences investigations on fire and those who advocate air quality and health science concerned with fire smoke.'

Person: Riebau, Fox
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Tree species rarely exposed to burning, like in everwet tropical forests, are unlikely to be fire adapted. Therefore, one could hypothesize that these species are affected equally by burning and that tree abundance changes are linked solely to fire...

Person: Slik, Breman, Bernard, van Beek, Cannon, Eichhorn, Sidiyasa
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'One way to protect the WUI is to restore surrounding landscapes to a healthy, resilient condition. Healthy, resilient forest ecosystems are less likely to see uncharacteristically severe wildfires that turn into human and...

Person: Tidwell, Brown
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Smoldering fires, the slow, low-temperature, flameless form of combustion, are an important phenomena in the Earth system, and the most persistent type of combustion. The most important fuels involved in smoldering fires are...

Person: Revkin, Rein
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Increased forest density resulting from decades of fire exclusion is often perceived as the leading cause of historically aberrant, severe, contemporary wildfires and insect outbreaks documented in some fire-prone forests of the western United States....

Person: Naficy, Sala, Keeling, Graham, DeLuca
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In forests, termites serve as ''soil engineers,'' translocating mineral soil to the surface, constructing macropores to improve water infiltration, increase soil minerals and organic carbon, facilitate the growth of microbes and...

Person: Peterson
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire-scarred trees provide a deep temporal record of historical fire activity, but identifying the mechanisms therein that controlled landscape fire patterns is not straightforward. We use a spatially correlated metric for fire co-occurrence between...

Person: Kennedy, McKenzie
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire burnt forest biomass can be salvaged as feedstock for bioenergy power generating stations. Despite availability of such forest biomass in northwestern Ontario, its procurement has generally been considered uneconomic and no studies have looked...

Person: Gautam, Pulkki, Shahi, Leitch
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'As the only agency managing lands in all 50 states and every U.S. territory, the FWS [Fish and Wildlife Service] manages fire on the greatest number of units with the smallest fire budget of any federal agency.'

Person: Gleason
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS