Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 354

We developed a new software package, burnr, for fire history analysis and plotting in the R statistical programming environment. It was developed for tree-ring fire-scar analysis, but is broadly applicable to other event analyses (e.g., avalanches,...

Person: Malevich, Guiterman, Margolis
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Tick population control technologies have been studied for several decades but no method is successful in all situations. The success of each technology depends on tick species identity and abundance, host species identity and abundance, phenology of...

Person: White, Gaff
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Raging wildfires have devastated vast areas of California and Australia in recent years, and predictions are that we will see more of the same in coming years as a result of climate change. But this is nothing new. Since the dawn of life on land, large...

Person: Scott
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

With support from the NASA Applied Sciences Program, the Alaska Fire Science Consortium (AFSC; part of the International Arctic Research Center at UAF) organized an international workshop in April 2017 to advance the application of remote sensing tools...

Person: Jandt, Ziel
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Preliminary findings on recovery of 6 tundra and forest-tundra sites that burned in 2012 in NWT.  Development of post-fire plant communities is controlled by burn severity.

Person: Chen
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The National Park Service (NPS) manages non-native invasive plant species that impact the natural and cultural resources and visitor experience in parks. This document provides an overview of key technical concepts and critical information needed to...

Person: Dingman, Abella, Frey, Budde, Hogan
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the Alaska Climate Change Adaption Series.

Wildfires are a natural part of the boreal ecosystem. Wildfires help maintain vegetation diversity, providing suitable habitats for wildlife, but wildfires can also present a threat to human values...

Person:
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This agreement is made and entered into by the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Joint Fire Science Program (BLM), and the University of Nevada Reno for the purpose of Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Joint Fire Science Program...

Person: Singletary, Evans
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Common practices for invasive species control and management include physical, chemical, and biological approaches. The first two approaches have clear limitations and may lead to unintended (negative) consequences, unless carefully planned and...

Person: Guo, Brockway, Larson, Wang, Ren
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Some forest managers have had concerns that prescribed burning after drought will stress mature pines, and increase their susceptibility to beetle attack. However, this concern resulted in many missed opportunities for applying fire after a recent...

Person: Coyle
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES