Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Understanding species diversity and disturbance relationships is important for biodiversity conservation in disturbance-driven boreal forests. Species richness and evenness may respond differently with stand development following fire. Furthermore, few...

Person: Yeboah, Chen, Kingston
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Context. Fine-scale ecological data collected across broad regions are becoming increasingly available. Appropriate geographic analyses of these data can help identify locations of ecological concern.Objectives. We present one such approach, spatial...

Person: Potter, Koch, Oswalt, Iannone
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed fire has become a commonly used forest management tool for reducing the occurrence of severe wildfires, decreasing fuel loads and reestablishing the historic ecological influences of fire. Investigating population-level wildlife responses to...

Person: O'donnell, Thompson, Semlitsch
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Humans affect fire regimes by providing ignition sources in some cases, suppressing wildfires in others, and altering natural vegetation in ways that may either promote or limit fire. In North America, several studies have evaluated the effects of...

Person: Parisien, Miller, Parks, DeLancey, Robinne, Flannigan
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wildfire has been an important process affecting the Earth's surface and atmosphere for over 350 million years and human societies have coexisted with fire since their emergence. Yet many consider wildfire as an accelerating problem, with widely held...

Person: Doerr, Santín
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Fire and Vegetation in a Changing Climate on the Kenai Peninsula: a 14,000-year Record presented by Ed Berg of the US Fish and Wildlife Service. This webinar was part of a series hosted by the Alaska Natural Resource and Outdoor Education (ANROE)...

Person: Berg
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Tundra Fires in a Changing Climate presented by Jennifer Barnes of the National Park Service. This webinar was part of a series hosted by the Alaska Natural Resource and Outdoor Education (ANROE) Association titled "Fire in a Changing Climate for...

Person: Barnes
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Climate Change Implications for Wildfire in Alaska presented by Randi Jandt. This webinar was part of a series hosted by the Alaska Natural Resource and Outdoor Education (ANROE) Association titled "Fire in a Changing Climate for Educators." ANROE...

Person: Jandt
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The historical and presettlement relationships between drought and wildfire are well documented in North America, with forest fire occurrence and area clearly increasing in response to drought. There is also evidence that drought interacts with other...

Person: Littell, Peterson, Riley, Liu, Luce
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

A Southern Fire Exchange webinar hosted by NC State University and presented by Toddi Steelman, Executive Director and Professor at the School of Environment and Sustainability at the University of Saskatchewan. This 1-hour webinar discussed US fire...

Person: Steelman
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES