Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Randi Jandt presents for the 2016 Fire Presentation Series organized by the Alaska Natural Resources and Outdoor Education (ANROE) Association.

Person: Jandt
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

We synthesize insights from current understanding of drought impacts at stand-to-biogeographic scales, including management options, and we identify challenges to be addressed with new research. Large stand-level shifts underway in western forests...

Person: Clark, Iverson, Woodall, Allen, Bell, Bragg, D'Amato, Davis, Hersh, Ibanez, Jackson, Matthews, Pederson, Peters, Schwartz, Waring, Zimmermann
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) in the western Canadian Arctic is experiencing environmental changes that affect subsistence harvesting practices and are of concern to local communities. In order to assess the impacts of multiple disturbances on...

Person: Tyson, Lantz, Ban
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Much recent research has investigated the effects of burning on mature black spruce (Picea mariana) forests in interior Alaska, however little research has focused on how frequent reburning affects soil organic layer (SOL) vulnerability in these...

Person: Hoy, Turetsky, Kasischke
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

1. Wildfires are the principal disturbance in the boreal forest, and their size and frequency are increasing as the climate warms. Impacts of fires on boreal wildlife are largely unknown, especially for the tens of millions of waterfowl that breed in...

Person: Lewis, Schmutz, Amundson, Lindberg
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal forests are critical sinks in the global carbon cycle. However, recent studies have revealed increasing frequency and extent of wildfires, decreasing landscape greenness, increasing tree mortality and declining growth of black and white spruce...

Person: Sullivan, Pattison, Brownlee, Cahoon, Hollingsworth
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfires are a common disturbance event in the Canadian boreal forest. Within event boundaries, the level of vegetation mortality varies greatly. Understanding where surviving vegetation occurs within fire events and how this relates to pre-fire...

Person: Ferster, Eskelson, Andison, LeMay
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We assessed the nutritional strategy of true morels (genus Morchella) collected in 2003 and 2004 in Oregon and Alaska, 1 or 2 y after forest fires. We hypothesized that the patterns of stable isotopes (d13C and d15N) in the sporocarps would match those...

Person: Hobbie, Rice, Weber, Smith
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Understanding species diversity and disturbance relationships is important for biodiversity conservation in disturbance-driven boreal forests. Species richness and evenness may respond differently with stand development following fire. Furthermore, few...

Person: Yeboah, Chen, Kingston
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal fires have immediate effects on regional carbon budgets by emitting CO2 into the atmosphere at the time of burning, but they also have legacy effects by initiating a long-term carbon sink during post-fire vegetation recovery. Quantifying these...

Person: Yue, Ciais, Zhu, Wang, Peng, Piao
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS