Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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The following list of fire research topics and questions were generated by personnel from agencies and organizations within AWFCG during 2014 Fall Fire Review and through other solicitations. The topics were initially ranked by the AWFCG Fire Research...

Person: York
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Hearing about climate-driven plant community changes takes on new meaning when they name names of the passengers who might not be boarding the flight to the future. A recent paper by Hollingsworth et al. (2013) does just that, analyzing fire severity...

Person: Jandt
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

At the request of public and private wildland fire managers who recognized a need to assimilate current fire effects knowledge, we produced this state-of-the-art integrated series of documents relevant to management of ecosystems. The series covers our...

Person: Brown, Smith, Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Large and intense wildfires are integral to the globally important boreal forest biome. While much is known about boreal wildfires, the focus on forest remnants that either escape or survive these intense fires is a recent phenomenon: academics now...

Person: Perera, Buse
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is one of the most destructive threats faced by our forests. Fire is good servant but a bad master. The fire season starts in March/April continues up to June. Wildfires destroy not only flora (tree, herbs, grassland, forbs, etc.) and their...

Person: Jhariya, Raj
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Understanding the complex mechanisms controlling treeline advance or retreat in the arctic and subarctic has important implications for projecting ecosystem response to changes in climate. Changes in landcover due to a treeline biome shift would alter...

Person: Chapin, Hollingsworth, Hewitt
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Western Arctic Caribou Herd (WACH) has increased dramatically in size over the last forty years, from approximately 75,000 animals in 1970 to 490,000 in 2003, and is now estimated at approximately 348,000 (Dau 2005, Joly et al. 2006). With the...

Person: Fulkerson, Carlson
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

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Person: Jandt, York
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In Arctic Alaska, changes in climate are expected to increase the extent and frequency of wildfires yet the implication and consequences are poorly understood.  Predicting landscape flammability and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change is...

Person: Breen, Bennett, Hewitt, Hollingsworth, Genet, Euskirchen, McGuire, Rupp
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ongoing changes in disturbance regimes are predicted to cause acute changes in ecosystem structure and function in the coming decades, but many aspects of these predictions are uncertain. A key challenge is to improve the predictability of...

Person: McLauchlan, Higuera, Gavin, Perakis, Mack, Alexander, Battles, Biondi, Buma, Colombaroli, Enders, Engstrom, Hu, Marlon, Marshall, McGlone, Morris, Nave, Shuman, Smithwick, Urrego, Wardle, Williams, Williams
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES