Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 229

Climate is changing across a range of scales, from local to global, but ecological consequences remain difficult to understand and predict. Such projections are complicated by change in the connectivity of resources, particularly water, nutrients, and...

Person: Marshall, Blair, Peters, Okin, Rango, Williams
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In the Ajusco volcano, in Central Mexico, prescribed burnings of low and high intensity were applied in March and May 2002, along with one unburned control for March and another for May, considering conditions of open stands and closed stands, with the...

Person: Martinez-Hernandez, Rodríguez-Trejo
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We compare biomass burning emissions estimates from four different techniques that use satellite based fire products to determine area burned over regional to global domains. Three of the techniques use active fire detections from polar-orbiting MODIS...

Person: Al-Saadi, Soja, Pierce, Szykman, Wiedinmyer, Emmons, Kondragunta, Zhang, Kittaka, Schaack, Bowman
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Editorial comment ... 'In this wide-ranging essay, Stephen Pyne, the preeminent historian of wildfire around the world, explores the past, present, and future of the term 'wildland-urban interface' and the policies regarding fire in that...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Editorial comment ... 'The Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) is a common story line in many of today's wildfire events. The WUI concept was formally introduced in 1987 Forest Service Research budget documents but was not acknowledged as a major...

Person: Sommers
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Conclusions (p.60) ... 'To determine if fire can be used to reduce invasions by nonnative species, precise knowledge of invasive plant morphology, phenology, and life history must be combined with knowledge of the invaded site, its...

Person: Zouhar, Smith, Sutherland, Brooks, Rice, Smith
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Summary (p.267) ... 'Nonnative species that establish after disturbances on low frequency crown fire regimes may become persistent members of the vegetation community. While opportunities for establishment of nonnative species may be...

Person: Zouhar, Smith, Sutherland, Brooks, Martinson, Hunter, Freeman, Omi
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Conclusions (p.222) ... 'Given the uncertainties regarding future climatic conditions and fire regimes, fire management techniques should be developed that avoid transporting or facilitating the movement of nonnative plant propagules...

Person: Zouhar, Smith, Sutherland, Brooks, Anzinger, Radosevich
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text (p.45) ... 'In this chapter I have presented a number of examples of how plant invasions can alter fire regimes. Although the ecological implications of these changes can be significant, one must remember that few plant invasions...

Person: Zouhar, Smith, Sutherland, Brooks, Brooks
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Soil water dynamics reflect the integrated effects of climate conditions, soil hydrological properties and vegetation at a site. Consequently, changes in tree density call have important ecohydrological implications. Notably, stand density in many semi...

Person: Zou, Breshears, Newman, Wilcox, Gard, Rich
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS