Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 71 - 80 of 6288

Due to an aging landowner population, there will be an unprecedented ownership shift in land-based assets in the USA. Approximately 2.7 million family forest owners (FFOs) in the USA over the age of 55 years old, reflecting 80 % of all FFO-owned land,...

Person: Markowski-Lindsay, Catanzaro, Milman, Kittredge
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The location, timing, spatial extent, and frequency of wildfires are changing rapidly in many parts of the world, producing substantial impacts on ecosystems, people, and potentially climate. Paleofire records based on charcoal accumulation in...

Person: Marlon, Kelly, Daniau, Vannière, Power, Bartlein, Higuera, Blarquez, Brewer, Brücher, Feurdean, Gil-Romera, Iglesias, Maezumi, Magi, Courtney Mustaphi, Zhihai
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The societal risks of water scarcity and water-quality impairment have received considerable attention, evidenced by recent analyses of these topics by the 2030 Water Resources Group, the United Nations and the World Economic Forum. What are the...

Person: Martin
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This study examines the production and efficiency of wildland fire suppression effort We estimate the effectiveness of suppression resource inputs to produce controlled fire lines that contain large wildland fires using stochastic frontier analysis....

Person: Katuwal, Calkin, Hand
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Non-deforestation fire - i.e., fire that is typically followed by the recovery of natural vegetation - is arguably the most influential disturbance in terrestrial ecosystems, thereby playing a major role in carbon exchanges and affecting many climatic...

Person: Landry, Matthews
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The field of conservation genetics, when properly implemented, is a constant juggling act integrating molecular genetics, ecology, and demography with applied aspects concerning managing declining species or implementing conservation laws and policies...

Person: Haig, Miller, Bellinger, Draheim, Mercer, Mullins
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

An assessment of outcomes from research projects funded by the Joint Fire Science Program was conducted to determine whether or not science has been used to inform management and policy decisions and to explore factors that facilitate use of fire...

Person: Hunter
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In an effort to reduce CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning, renewable energy policies incentivize use of forest biomass as an energy source. Many governments have assumed (legislated) the carbon flux from burning biomass to be neutral because...

Person: Johnston, van Kooten
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire risk in temperate forests has become a nearly intractable problem that can be characterized as a socioecological 'pathology': that is, a set of complex and problematic interactions among social and ecological systems across multiple...

Person: Fischer, Spies, Steelman, Moseley, Johnson, Bailey, Ager, Bourgeron, Charnley, Collins, Kline, Leahy, Littell, Millington, Nielsen-Pincus, Olsen, Paveglio, Roos, Steen-Adams, Stevens, Vukomanovic, White, Bowman
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Anthropogenic drivers of global change include rising atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses and resulting changes in the climate, as well as nitrogen deposition, biotic invasions, altered disturbance regimes, and land...

Person: Franklin, Serra-Diaz, Syphard, Regan
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS