Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 282

The large mediatic coverage of recent massive wildfires across the world has emphasized the vulnerability of freshwater resources. The extensive hydrogeomorphic effects from a wildfire can impair the ability of watersheds to provide safe drinking water...

Person: Robinne, Bladon, Miller, Parisien, Mathieu, Flannigan
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Hydrologic recovery after wildfire is critical for restoring the ecosystem services of protecting of human lives and infrastructure from hazards and delivering water supply of sufficient quality and quantity. Recovery of soil-hydraulic properties, such...

Person: Ebel, Martin
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire plays a critical role in biodiversity, carbon balance, soil erosion, and nutrient and hydrological cycles. While empirical evidence shows that fuel reduction burning can reduce the incidence, severity and extent of unplanned fires in Australia and...

Person: Gharun, Possell, Bell, Adams
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

1. Wildfires are the principal disturbance in the boreal forest, and their size and frequency are increasing as the climate warms. Impacts of fires on boreal wildlife are largely unknown, especially for the tens of millions of waterfowl that breed in...

Person: Lewis, Schmutz, Amundson, Lindberg
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) is the largest agricultural land-retirement program in the United States, providing many environmental benefits, including wildlife habitat and improved air, water, and soil quality. Since 2007, however, CRP area...

Person: Morefield, LeDuc, Clark, Iovanna
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A surface barrier is a commonly used technology for isolation of subsurface contaminants. Surface barriers for isolating radioactive waste are expected to perform for centuries to millennia, yet there are very few data for field-scale surface barriers...

Person: Zhang
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The societal risks of water scarcity and water-quality impairment have received considerable attention, evidenced by recent analyses of these topics by the 2030 Water Resources Group, the United Nations and the World Economic Forum. What are the...

Person: Martin
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In the Alaskan Arctic, rapid climate change is increasing the frequency of disturbance including wildfire and permafrost collapse. These pulse disturbances may influence the delivery of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to aquatic ecosystems, however the...

Person: Larouche, Abbott, Bowden, Jones
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We propose the Stream Biome Gradient Concept as a way to predict macroscale biological patterns in streams. This concept is based on the hypothesis that many abiotic and biotic features of streams change predictably along climate (temperature and...

Person: Dodds, Gido, Whiles, Daniels, Grudzinski
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fires are the major natural disturbance in the boreal forest, and their frequency and intensity will likely increase as the climate warms. Terrestrial nutrients released by fires may be transported to boreal lakes, stimulating increased primary...

Person: Lewis, Lindberg, Schmutz, Bertram
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS