Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 169

Wildland fire management has reached a crossroads. Current perspectives are not capable of answering interdisciplinary adaptation and mitigation challenges posed by increases in wildfire risk to human populations and the need to reintegrate fire as a...

Person: Smith, Kolden, Paveglio, Cochrane, Bowman, Moritz, Kliskey, Alessa, Hudak, Hoffman, Lutz, Queen, Goetz, Higuera, Boschetti, Flannigan, Yedinak, Watts, Strand, van Wagtendonk, Anderson, Stocks, Abatzoglou
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We used the TELSA forest landscape model to examine the long-term consequences of applying different forest management scenarios on indicators of wildlife habitat, understory productivity, crown fuel hazard, timber yield and treatment costs. The study...

Person: Klenner, Walton
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

For at least two decades, expansion of low-density residential development at the wildland-urban interface has been widely recognized as a primary factor influencing the management of US national forests. We estimate the location, extent, and trends in...

Person: Theobald, Romme
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The emergence of large fires of long duration (also known as siege fires) with their inherently high costs has raised numerous questions about the opportunities for cost containment. Cost reviews from the 2003 fire season have revealed how additional...

Person: MacGregor, Haynes
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Our work has shown that a single focal point is critical for efforts -- such as reducing severe wildland fires and the vegetation that fuels them -- that involve many federal agencies as well as state and local governments, the...

Person: Hill, Janik, Belak, Cotton, Dominicci, Johnson, Jones, Joy, Vargas
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Nazzaro
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Lyon, Huff, Hooper, Telfer, Schreiner, Smith, Lyon, Smith
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire, competition for light and water, and native forest pests have interacted for millennia in western forests to produce a countryside dominated by seral species of conifers. These conifer-dominated ecosystems exist in six kinds of biotic communities...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, McDonald, Harvey, Tonn
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Idaho Panhandle National Forests (IPNF), in partnership with the University of Idaho, the Fire Sciences Laboratory, and The Sampson Group, developed a Geographic Information System (GIS) based wildfire hazard-risk assessment. The assessment was...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Harkins, Morgan, Neuenschwander, Chrisman, Zack, Jacobson, Grant, Sampson
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

An increasing severity in the occurrence of wildfires in Mexico has been recently associated with the activity of 'El Nino' Southern Oscillation (ENSO). A spatio-temporal analysis of fire potential indicated that indeed, catastrophic fires...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Mora, Hernandez-Cardenas
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS