Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

As the permafrost region warms, its large organic carbon pool will be increasingly vulnerable to decomposition, combustion, and hydrologic export. Models predict that some portion of this release will be offset by increased production of Arctic and...

Person: Abbott, Jones, Schuur, Chapin, Bowden, Bret-Harte, Epstein, Flannigan, Harms, Hollingsworth, Mack, McGuire, Natali, Rocha, Tank, Turetsky, Vonk, Wickland, Aiken, Alexander, Amon, Benscoter, Bergeron, Bishop, Blarquez, Bond-Lamberty, Breen, Buffam, Cai, Carcaillet, Carey, Chen, Chen, Christensen, Cooper, Cornelissen, de Groot, DeLuca, Dorrepaal, Fetcher, Finlay, Forbes, French, Gauthier, Girardin, Goetz, Goldammer, Gough, Grogan, Guo, Higuera, Hinzman, Hu, Hugelius, Jafarov, Jandt, Johnstone, Karlsson
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Large wildland fires are complex, costly events influenced by a vast array of physical, climatic, and social factors. Changing climate, fuel buildup due to past suppression, and increasing populations in the wildland-urban interface have all been...

Person: Canton-Thompson, Gebert, Thompson, Jones, Calkin, Donovan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Recent high-latitude warming is increasing the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, which is amplified by local disturbances such as fire. However, the long-term ecological effects and carbon dynamics are not well understood. Here we present a 2200-...

Person: Jones, Booth, Yu, Ferry
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

In 2007, the Anaktuvuk River Fire (ARF) became the largest recorded tundra fire on the North Slope of Alaska. The ARF burned for nearly three months, consuming more than 100,000 ha. At its peak in early September, the ARF burned at a rate of 7000 ha d-...

Person: Jones, Kolden, Jandt, Abatzoglou, Urban, Arp
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Extreme fire seasons in recent years and associated high suppression expenditures have brought about a chorus of calls for reform of federal firefighting structure and policy. Given the political nature of the topic, a critical review of past trends in...

Person: Calkin, Gebert, Jones, Neilson
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

A new one-dimensional heat conduction model for predicting stem heating during fires is presented. Themodel makes use of moisture- and temperature-dependent thermal properties for layers of bark and wood. The thermal aspects of the processes of bark...

Person: Jones, Webb, Jimenez, Reardon, Butler
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS