Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

The purpose of this study was to generate a physical fitness profile of an interagency hotshot crew mid-way through the wildland fire season. Twenty interagency hotshot crew firefighters completed measures of body composition, aerobic fitness,...

Person: Sell, Livingston
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Differential thermal, thermogravimetric, and derivative thermogravimetric analyses were used to study the effects of two important fire retardant chemicals-ammonium phosphate and ammonium sulfate-on the pyrolysis and combustion of cellulose. To aid in...

Person: George, Susott
Year: 1971
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Community wildfire protection planning has become an important tool for engaging wildland-urban interface residents and other stakeholders in efforts to address their mutual concerns about wildland fire management, prioritize hazardous fuel reduction...

Person: Williams, Jakes, Burns, Cheng, Nelson, Sturtevant, Brummel, Staychock, Souter
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Policymakers and decision makers alike have suggested that the use of less aggressive suppression strategies for wildland fires might help stem the tide of rising emergency wildland fire expenditures. However, the interplay of wildland fire management...

Person: Gebert, Black
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a highly toxic, nonirritating gas. One of the products of combustion, it is invisible, odorless, tasteless, and slightly lighter than air. But smoke, another combustion product, is visible. And when smoke is present, it is...

Person: Countryman
Year: 1971
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Research data and literature are sparse on fire in the taiga and subartic zones, especially regarding effects of fire on soil and water relations and on associated resource management considerations. In the scattered existing work, there is...

Person: Sykes, Tallmon, Mills
Year: 1971
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

In preparing for this symposium, discussion inevitably turned to the many facets of wildfire in the subarctic which should be considered - material, philosophical, economic. Is fire detrimental to the environment? 'Are the practices which you...

Person: Slaughter, Barney, Hansen, Slaughter, Sylvester, Wein, McVee, Klein
Year: 1971
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Findings from a study of fire effects on the aquatic environment lead to the conclusion that the fire had fewer deleterious effects than did activities from fighting the fire -- improper siting of 'cat' lines as an example. These findings...

Person: Slaughter, Barney, Hansen, Lotspeich, Mueller
Year: 1971
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Most of the existing Alaskan State and National Parks were established to provide for human enjoyment of the natural features and to preserve the area in its natural condition. The natural condition is identified as that occurring before the effects of...

Person: Slaughter, Barney, Hansen, Hoffman
Year: 1971
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

During summer 1969, fires burned 86,000 acres of the Kenai National Moose Range, south-central Alaska; two fires accounted for 99 percent of the burned area. Suppression efforts involved nearly 5,000 men; 135 miles of catline were constructed, and 822,...

Person: Slaughter, Barney, Hansen, Hakala, Seemel, Richey, Kurtz
Year: 1971
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS