Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 35

Wildfire risk in temperate forests has become a nearly intractable problem that can be characterized as a socioecological 'pathology': that is, a set of complex and problematic interactions among social and ecological systems across multiple...

Person: Fischer, Spies, Steelman, Moseley, Johnson, Bailey, Ager, Bourgeron, Charnley, Collins, Kline, Leahy, Littell, Millington, Nielsen-Pincus, Olsen, Paveglio, Roos, Steen-Adams, Stevens, Vukomanovic, White, Bowman
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'For suppression and prescribed fire operations, accurate RH information can be critical.'

Person: White
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Canada's forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle because of their large and dynamic C stocks. Detailed monitoring of C exchange between forests and the atmosphere and improved understanding of the processes that affect the...

Person: Stinson, Kurz, Smyth, Neilson, Dymond, Metsaranta, Boisvenue, Rampley, Li, White, Blain
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Each tribe can be a valuable source of information and a natural ally for communicating wildland fire messages.'

Person: White, McDowell
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Desert grasslands, which are very sensitive to external drivers like climate change, are areas affected by rapid land degradation processes. In many regions of the world the common form of land degradation involves the rapid encroachment of woody...

Person: Ravi, D'Odorico, Wang, White, Okin, Macko, Collins
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We review a broad range of mitigation strategies associated with the management of Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins). We consider: methods that are currently utilised or have been proposed for controlling beetle populations; the...

Person: Coops, Timko, Wulder, White, Ortlepp
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Ecosystem responses to key climate drivers are reflected in phenological dynamics such as the timing and degree of ''green-up'' that integrate responses over spatial scales from individual plants to ecosystems. This integration is...

Person: Rich, Breshears, White
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prior to proceeding with large-scale fire reintroduction as a grassland management option, appropriate fire frequencies need to be determined. This research experimentally tested the effects of dormant-season fire on ground cover and on plant and soil...

Person: Masters, Galley, Ford, White
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There is growing concern that populations of migratory ungulates are declining globally. Causes of declines in migratory behavior can be direct (i.e., differential harvest of migrants) or indirect (i.e., habitat fragmentation or land-use changes). Elk...

Person: Hebblewhite, Merrill, Morgantini, White, Allen, Bruns, Thurston, Hurd
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Natural disturbances are critical to wilderness management. This paper reviews recent research on natural disturbance and addresses the problem of managing for disturbances in a world of human-imposed scales and boundaries. The dominant scale issue in...

Person: Cole, McCool, Borrie, O'Loughlin, White, Harrod, Walker, Jentsch
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS