Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 34

Fire frequency, extent, and size exhibit a strong linkage with climate conditions and play a vital role in the climate system. Previous studies have shown that the frequency of large fires in the western United States increased significantly since the...

Person: Yang, Tian, Tao, Ren, Pan, Liu, Wang
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal fires have immediate effects on regional carbon budgets by emitting CO2 into the atmosphere at the time of burning, but they also have legacy effects by initiating a long-term carbon sink during post-fire vegetation recovery. Quantifying these...

Person: Yue, Ciais, Zhu, Wang, Peng, Piao
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Aim: Change in spring phenology is a sensitive indicator of ecosystem response to climate change, and exerts first-order control on the ecosystem carbon and hydrological cycles. The start of season (SOS) in spring can be estimated from satellite data...

Person: Wang, Piao, Xu, Ciais, MacBean, Myneni, Li
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In Canadian forests, the majority of burned area occurs on a small number of days of extreme fire weather. These days lie within the tail end of the distribution of fire weather, and are often the periods when fire suppression capacity is most...

Person: Wang, Thompson, Marshall, Tymstra, Carr, Flannigan
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fires in croplands, plantations, and rangelands contribute significantly to fire emissions in the United States, yet are often overshadowed by wildland fires in efforts to develop inventories or estimate responses to climate change. Here we quantified...

Person: Lin, McCarty, Wang, Rogers, Morton, Collatz, Jin, Randerson
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forests. They leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. This forest age dynamics must be included in vegetation models to accurately...

Person: Yue, Ciais, Luyssaert, Cadule, Harden, Randerson, Bellassen, Wang, Piao, Poulter, Viovy
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The evaluation of area-specific risks for large fires is of great policy relevance to fire management and prevention. When analyzing data for the burned areas of large fires in Canada, we found that there are dramatic patterns that cannot be adequately...

Person: Wang, Ma, Li
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Disturbances have been recognized as a key factor shaping terrestrial ecosystem states and dynamics. A general model that quantitatively describes the relationship between carbon storage and disturbance regime is critical for better understanding large...

Person: Weng, Luo, Wang, Wang, Hayes, McGuire, Hastings, Schimel
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Studying changes to the shape, size, and arrangement of patches of forest habitat remains a challenge in the field of landscape ecology. A major issue is that most landscape pattern metrics measure both the amount of habitat as well as habitat...

Person: Wang, Hamann, Cumming
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest disturbances are major sources of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, and therefore impact global climate. Biogeophysical attributes, such as surface albedo (reflectivity), further control the climate-regulating properties of forests. Using both...

Person: O'Halloran, Law, Goulden, Wang, Barr, Schaaf, Brown, Fuentes, Göckede, Black, Engel
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS