Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 35

Mega-fires are often defined according to their size and intensity but are more accurately described by their socioeconomic impacts. Three factors -- climate change, fire exclusion, and antecedent disturbance, collectively referred to as the 'mega...

Person: Stephens, Burrows, Buyantuyev, Gray, Keane, Kubian, Liu, Seijo, Shu, Tolhurst, van Wagtendonk
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the introduction ... 'Announcing the release of new software packages for application in wildland fire science and management, two fields that are already fully saturated with computer technology, may seem a bit too much to many managers....

Person: Keane, Dillon, Drury, Innes, Morgan, Lutes, Prichard, Smith, Strand
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire management faces important emergent issues in the coming years such as climate change, fire exclusion impacts, and wildland-urban development, so new, innovative means are needed to address these challenges. Field studies, while preferable and...

Person: Keane, Loehman, Holsinger
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Research activities focused on estimating the direct emissions of carbon from wildland fires across North America are reviewed as part of the North American Carbon Program disturbance synthesis. A comparison of methods to estimate the loss of carbon...

Person: French, de Groot, Jenkins, Rogers, Alvarado, Amiro, de Jong, Goetz, Hoy, Hyer, Keane, Law, McKenzie, McNulty, Ottmar, Perez-Salicrup, Randerson, Robertson, Turetsky
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper examines the past, present, and future use of the concept of historical range and variability (HRV) in land management. The history, central concepts, benefits, and limitations of HRV are presented along with a discussion on the value of HRV...

Person: Keane, Hessburg, Landres, Swanson
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Many natural resource agencies and organizations recognize the importance of fuel treatments as tools for reducing fire hazards and restoring ecosystems. However, there continues to be confusion and misconception about fuel treatments and their...

Person: Reinhardt, Keane, Calkin, Cohen
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Canopy and surface fuels in many fire-prone forests of the United States have increased over the last 70 years as a result of modern fire exclusion policies, grazing, and other land management activities. The Healthy Forest Restoration Act and National...

Person: Keane, Rollins, Zhu
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The revision of FOFEM, a national fire effects model, is described. FOFEM 5.0 will incorporate the predictions of fuel consumption, tree mortality and smoke production along with the addition of soil heating and an updated user interface. The revised...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Reinhardt, Mincemoyer, Keane
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fuel input layers for the FARSITE fire growth model were created for all lands in and around the Gila National Forest, New Mexico, using satellite imagery, terrain modeling, and biophysical simulation. FARSITE is a spatially explicit fire growth model...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Keane, Mincemoyer, Schmidt, Garner
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Landscape patterns in the northwestern United States are mostly shaped by the interaction of fire and succession, and conversely, vegetation patterns influence fire dynamics and plant colonization processes. Historical landscape pattern dynamics can be...

Person: Engstrom, Galley, de Groot, Parsons, Keane, Hessburg
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS