Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Much recent research has investigated the effects of burning on mature black spruce (Picea mariana) forests in interior Alaska, however little research has focused on how frequent reburning affects soil organic layer (SOL) vulnerability in these...

Person: Hoy, Turetsky, Kasischke
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire, a dominant disturbance in boreal forests, is highly variable in occurrence and behavior at multiple spatiotemporal scales. New data sets provide more detailed spatial and temporal observations of active fires and the post-burn environment in...

Person: Barrett, Loboda, McGuire, Genet, Hoy, Kasischke
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A synthesis was carried out to analyze information available to quantify fire activity and burned area across North America, including a comparison of different data sources and an assessment of how variations in burned area estimate impact carbon...

Person: Kasischke, Loboda, Giglio, French, Hoy, de Jong, Riano
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Large fire years in which >1% of the landscape burns are becoming more frequent in the Alaskan (USA) interior, with four large fire years in the past 10 years, and 79 000 km2 (17% of the region) burned since 2000. We modeled fire severity conditions...

Person: Barrett, McGuire, Hoy, Kasischke
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

With the recently observed and projected trends of growing wildland fire occurrence in high northern latitudes, satellite-based burned area mapping in these regions is becoming increasingly important for scientific and fire management communities....

Person: Loboda, Hoy, Giglio, Kasischke
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Research activities focused on estimating the direct emissions of carbon from wildland fires across North America are reviewed as part of the North American Carbon Program disturbance synthesis. A comparison of methods to estimate the loss of carbon...

Person: French, de Groot, Jenkins, Rogers, Alvarado, Amiro, de Jong, Goetz, Hoy, Hyer, Keane, Law, McKenzie, McNulty, Ottmar, Perez-Salicrup, Randerson, Robertson, Turetsky
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The maximum solar elevation is typically less than 50 degrees in the Alaskan boreal region and solar elevation varies substantially during the growing season. Because of the relatively low solar elevation at boreal latitudes, the effect of topography...

Person: Verbyla, Kasischke, Hoy
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There has been considerable interest in the recent literature regarding the assessment of post-fire effects on forested areas within the North American boreal forest. Assessing the physical and ecological effects of fire in boreal forests has far-...

Person: French, Kasischke, Hall, Murphy, Verbyla, Hoy, Allen
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A method was developed to estimate carbon consumed during wildland fires in interior Alaska based on medium-spatial scale data (60 m cell size) generated on a daily basis. Carbon consumption estimates were developed for 41 fire events in the large fire...

Person: Kasischke, Hoy
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

A synthesis was carried out to examine Alaska's boreal forest fire regime. During the 2000s, an average of 767 000 ha x year-1 burned, 50% higher than in any previous decade since the 1940s. Over the past 60 years, there was a decrease in the...

Person: Kasischke, Verbyla, Rupp, McGuire, Murphy, Jandt, Barnes, Hoy, Duffy, Calef, Turetsky
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS