Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

Large wildfires of increasing frequency and severity threaten local populations and natural resources and contribute carbon emissions into the earth-climate system. Although wildfires have been researched and modeled for decades, no verifiable physical...

Person: Finney, Cohen, Forthofer, McAllister, Gollner, Gorham, Saito, Akafuah, Adam, English
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We explore the basis of understanding wildland fire behaviour with the intention of stimulating curiosity and promoting fundamental investigations of fire spread problems that persist even in the presence of tremendous modelling advances....

Person: Finney, Cohen, McAllister, Jolly
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The National Wildfire Coordinating Group definition of extreme fire behavior (EFB) indicates a level of fire behavior characteristics that ordinarily precludes methods of direct control action. One or more of the following is usually involved: high...

Person: Werth, Potter, Clements, Finney, Goodrick, Alexander, Cruz, Forthofer, McAllister
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In this paper we review progress towards the implementation of a risk management framework for US federal wildland fire policy and operations. We first describe new developments in wildfire simulation technology that catalyzed the development of risk-...

Person: Calkin, Finney, Ager, Thompson, Gebert
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The spatial, temporal, and social dimensions of wildfire risk are challenging U.S. federal land management agencies to meet societal needs while maintaining the health of the lands they manage. In this paper we present a quantitative, geospatial...

Person: Thompson, Calkin, Finney, Ager, Gilbertson-Day
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This report was designed to meet three broad goals: (1) evaluate wildfire hazard on Federal lands; (2) develop information useful in prioritizing where fuels treatments and mitigation measures might be proposed to address significant fire hazard and...

Person: Calkin, Ager, Gilbertson-Day, Calkin, Ager, Gilbertson-Day, Scott, Finney, Schrader-Patton, Quigley, Strittholt, Kaiden
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There is still much uncertainty as to how wildfire affects the accumulation of burn residues (such as black carbon (BC)) in the soil, and the corresponding changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) composition in boreal forests. We investigated SOC and BC...

Person: Kane, Hockaday, Turetsky, Masiello, Valentine, Finney, Baldock
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Billions of dollars are spent annually in the United States to contain large wildland fires, but the factors contributing to suppression success remain poorly understood. We used a regression model (generalized linear mixed-model) to model containment...

Person: Finney, Grenfell, McHugh
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This article examines the growing number of wildfires in the United States. Forest fires are being fueled by deadwood and debris that have been allowed to accumulate by the caretakers of the land. The use of computer modeling is aiding in the...

Person: Andrews, Finney, Fischetti
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fuel teatment effects on the growth and behavior of large wildland fires depend on the spatial arrangements of individual treatment units. Evidence of this is found in burn patterns of wildland fires. During planning stages, fire simulation is most...

Person: Hayes, Ager, Barbour, Finney
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS