Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 51 - 59 of 59

[no description entered]

Person: Anonymous
Year: 1969
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The burning characteristics of several fire-retardant plants and Southern California chaparral shrubs of recognized high flammability were compared in muffle-furnance tests at 650 C. Fresh terminal growth of Atriplex lentiformis did not burn as readily...

Person: Montgomery, Cheo
Year: 1969
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Some consider that Douglas-fir seedlings initially grow better on burned than on similar but unburned soil. The improved growth is attributed to an increase in available nutrients as a result of combustion and to a release from vegetative competition....

Person: Baker, Phelps
Year: 1969
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Kiil, Grigel
Year: 1969
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fine-fuel moisture content tables, using dry bulb and dewpoint temperatures as entry data, have been developed for use with the National Fire-Danger Rating System in Alaska. Comparisons have been made which illustrate differences resulting from danger-...

Person: Barney
Year: 1969
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Experimental testing of a mathematical model showed that radiant heat transfer accounted for no more than 40% of total heat flux required to maintain rate of spread. A reasonable prediction of spread was possible by assuming a horizontal convective...

Person: Anderson
Year: 1969
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Discusses (with particular reference to conditions in Alaska) the value of occasional small fires in burning undergrowth and litter to prevent the accumulation of inflammable material and the risk of major damage, the erosion likely to be caused by...

Person: Oberle
Year: 1969
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

There is a close relationship between root system characteristics and the relative fire resistance of Douglas fir forest zone species in southern interior British Columbia. Susceptible species are usually those that have fibrous root systems or produce...

Person: McLean
Year: 1969
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

From the Summary: 'I have discussed the reaction and behavior of animals to fire, smoke and the resulting burnt ground along four general lines: (1) Avoidance response to fire and smoke; (2) Animals attracted to fire and smoke; (3) Animals...

Person: Komarek
Year: 1969
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS