Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 78

Using the 2013 Yarnell Hill fatality fire in Arizona as a backdrop, this paper considers whether the global wildland fire community has failed on-the-ground firefighters. To begin answering this question two specific lines of inquiry are addressed: (i...

Person: Alexander, Taylor, Page
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A pictorial poster showing many cloud formations and what these clouds mean in regards to fire weather and fire behavior.

Person:
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A method to accurately understand the processes controlling the burning behavior of porous wildland fuels is presented using numerical simulations and laboratory experiments. A multiphase approach has been implemented in OpenFOAM, which is based on the...

Person: El Houssami, Thomas, Lamorlette, Morvan, Chaos, Hadden, Simeoni
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In the field of ecology, regime shifts are often abrupt and catastrophic occurrences with far reaching effects on global and local ecosystems which result in distinct changes in the composition and function of an ecosystem. The boreal forest provides a...

Person: Headman
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In wildfire science, spotting refers to non-local creation of new fires, due to downwind ignition of brands launched from a primary fire. Spotting is often mentioned as being one of the most difficult problems for wildfire management, because of its...

Person: Martin, Hillen
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Modeling the behavior of crown fires is challenging due to the complex set of coupled processes that drive the characteristics of a spreading wildfire and the large range of spatial and temporal scales over which these processes occur. Detailed physics...

Person: Hoffman, Canfield, Linn, Mell, Sieg, Pimont, Ziegler
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Vegetation, wildfire and atmospheric oxygen on Earth have changed throughout geological times, and are dependent on each other, determining the evolution of ecosystems, the carbon cycle, and the climate, as found in the fossil record. Previous work in...

Person: Huang, Rein
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This paper extends FARSITE (a software used for wildfire modeling and simulation) to incorporate data assimilation techniques based on noisy and limited spatial resolution observations of the fire perimeter to improve the accuracy of wildfire spread...

Person: Srivas, Artés, de Callafon, Altintas
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

One of the finest and most powerful assets of Finsler geometry is its ability to model, describe, and analyse in precise geometric terms an abundance of physical phenomena that are genuinely asymmetric, see e.g. Antonelli et al. (1993, 2003), Yajima...

Person: Markvorsen
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Global trends of climate warming have been particularly pronounced in northern latitudes, and have been linked to an intensification of the fire regime in Arctic and boreal ecosystems. Increases in fire frequency, extent, and severity that have been...

Person: Shenoy
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES