Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Climate and disturbance regimes are expected to change profoundly in 21st century forests. Whether and where forests may succumb to projected trends and shift to different ecosystem states is poorly resolved but essential for anticipating both...

Person: Hansen
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Analyses of bulk petrographic data indicate that during the Late Paleozoic wildfires were more prevalent than at present. We propose that the development of fire systems through this interval was controlled predominantly by the elevated atmospheric...

Person: Glasspool, Scott, Waltham, Pronina, Shao
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is a key ecological process affecting vegetation dynamics and land cover. The characteristic frequency, size, and intensity of fire are driven by interactions between top-down climate-driven and bottom-up fuel-related processes. Disentangling...

Person: Iglesias, Yospin, Whitlock
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A multidecadal analysis of fire in Alaskan Arctic tundra was completed using records from the Alaska Large Fire Database. Tundra vegetation fires are defined by the Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map and divided into five tundra ecoregions of Alaska. A...

Person: French, Jenkins, Loboda, Flannigan, Jandt, Bourgeau-Chavez, Whitley
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Anthropogenic climate change may result in novel disturbances to Arctic tundra ecosystems. Understanding the natural variability of tundra-fire regimes and their linkages to climate is essential in evaluating whether tundra burning has increased in...

Person: Hu, Higuera, Duffy, Chipman, Rocha, Young, Kelly, Dietze
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wildland fire is a keystone disturbance in the boreal forest, affecting everything from public safety, to woodpecker populations, to permafrost. How settlement by European people impacted wildland fire regimes in Alaska is poorly understood because...

Person: Mann, Gaglioti, Finney, Jones, Pohlman, Wooller
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is a critical component of the Earth system, and substantially influences land surface, climate change, and ecosystem dynamics. To accurately predict the fire regimes in the 21st century, it is essential to understand the historical fire patterns...

Person: Yang, Tian, Tao, Ren, Kush, Liu, Wang
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Dr. Jenn Marlon of Yale University compares her Western paleo charcoal and pollen data with her sites in Massachussets.

Person: Marlon
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES