Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Fire frequency and intensity are increasing due to higher temperatures and more droughts. The distributions of fuels (vegetation in natural conditions) are also changing in response to climate change. The vegetation in cold environments such as high...

Person: Liu, Yang
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

As the effects of climate change accumulate and intensify, resource managers juggle existing goals and new mandates to operationalize adaptation. Fire managers contend with the direct effects of climate change on resources in addition to climate-...

Person: Sample, Thode, Peterson, Gallagher, Flatley, Friggens, Evans, Loehman, Hedwall, Brandt, Janowiak, Swanston
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate change has lengthened wildfire seasons and transformed fire regimes throughout the world. Thus, capturing fuel and fire dynamics is critical for projecting Earth system processes in warmer and drier future. Recent advances in fire regime...

Person: Hanan, Kennedy, Ren, Johnson, Smith
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Despite the low annual temperatures and short growing seasons that are characteristic of high northern latitudes (HNL), wildland fire is the dominant ecological disturbance within the region's boreal forest, the world's largest terrestrial biome. The...

Person: York, Bhatt, Gargulinski, Grabinski, Jain, Soja, Thoman, Ziel
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Forest characteristics, structure, and dynamics within the North American boreal region are heavily influenced by wildfire intensity, severity, and frequency. Increasing temperatures are likely to result in drier conditions and longer fire seasons,...

Person: Foster, Shuman, Rogers, Walker, Mack, Bourgeau-Chavez, Veraverbeke, Goetz
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire is capable of rapidly releasing the energy stored in forests, with the amount of water in live and dead biomass acting as a regulator on the amount and rate of energy release. Here we used temperature and fuel moisture data to examine climate-...

Person: Goodwin, Zald, North, Hurteau
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This project concerned tundra fires in Alaska and how climate-driven changes in fire regimes could impact Alaska’s Arctic ecosystems. We used remote sensing, dendrochronology, field vegetation surveys, and paleoclimate reconstructions to accomplish...

Person: Mann, Gaglioti, Jones, Miller
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

There is mounting concern that global wildfire activity is shifting in frequency, intensity and seasonality in response to climate change. Fuel moisture provides a powerful means of detecting changing fire potential. Here, we use global burned area and...

Person: Ellis, Bowman, Jain, Flannigan, Williamson
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Higher temperatures, lower snowpacks, drought, and extended dry periods have contributed to increased wildfire activity in recent decades. Climate change is expected to increase the frequency of large fires, the cumulative area burned, and fire...

Person: Greenberg, Collins, Vose, Peterson, Fettig, Halofsky, Hiers, Keane, Loehman, Stambaugh
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In recent decades, climate change has lengthened wildfire seasons globally and doubled the annual area burned. Thus, capturing fire dynamics is critical for projecting Earth system processes in warmer, drier, more fire prone future. Recent advances in...

Person: Hanan, Kennedy, Ren, Johnson, Smith
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES