Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 1542

Background

‘Megafire’ is an emerging concept commonly used to describe fires that are extreme in terms of size, behaviour, and/or impacts, but the term’s meaning remains ambiguous.

Approach

We sought to resolve ambiguity...

Person: Linley, Jolly, Doherty, Geary, Armenteras, Belcher, Bird, Duane, Fletcher, Giorgis, Haslem, Jones, Kelly, Lee, Nolan, Parr, Pausas, Price, Regos, Ritchie, Ruffault, Williamson, Wu, Nimmo
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Along with the increase in the frequency of disastrous wildfires and bushfires around the world during the recent decades, scholarly research efforts have also intensified in this domain. This work investigates divisions and trends of the domain of...

Person: Haghani, Kuligowski, Rajabifard, Kolden
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Large wildfires of increasing frequency and severity threaten local populations and natural resources while contributing carbon emissions into the earth-climate system. Although wildfires have been researched and modeled for decades, no verifiable...

Person: Gollner
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Recent wildfire outbreaks around the world have prompted concern that climate change is increasing fire incidence, threatening human livelihood and biodiversity, and perpetuating climate change. Here we review current understanding of the impacts of...

Person: Jones, Abatzoglou, Veraverbeke, Andela, Lasslop, Forkel, Smith, Burton, Betts, Van der Werf
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

As the effects of climate change accumulate and intensify, resource managers juggle existing goals and new mandates to operationalize adaptation. Fire managers contend with the direct effects of climate change on resources in addition to climate-...

Person: Sample, Thode, Peterson, Gallagher, Flatley, Friggens, Evans, Loehman, Hedwall, Brandt, Janowiak, Swanston
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Calculated values of precipitation effectiveness index and temperature efficiency index for 48 weather observation stations on the Alaska mainland are used to delineate areas that have different climatic subclassifications during the wildfire season of...

Person: Trigg
Year: 1971
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

[from the text] A recent warning to humanity signed by >15 000 scientists identified global environmental threats that require urgent policy response from world leaders (Ripple et al 2017). Here, we document challenges and propose solutions related...

Person: Leverkus, Thorn, Gustafsson, Noss, Müller, Pausas, Lindenmayer
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The 2015 Paris Agreement led to a number of studies that assessed the impact of the 1.5 °C and 2.0 °C increases in global temperature over preindustrial levels. However, those assessments have not actively investigated the impact of these levels of...

Person: Son, Kim, Wang, Jeong, Woo, Jeong, Lee, Kim, LaPlante, Kwon
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Long-term assessment of severe wildfires and associated air pollution and related climate patterns in and around the Arctic is essential for assessing healthy human life status. To examine the relationships, we analyzed the National Aeronautics and...

Person: Yasunari, Nakamura, Kim, Choi, Lee, Tachibana, da Silva
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the global average, due in part to the albedo feedbacks of a diminishing cryosphere. As snow cover extent decreases, the underlying land is exposed, which has lower albedo and therefore absorbs more radiation,...

Person: Webb, Loranty, Lichstein
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES