Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Intensifying wildfire activity and climate change can drive rapid forest compositional shifts. In boreal North America, black spruce shapes forest flammability and depends on fire for regeneration. This relationship has helped black spruce maintain its...

Person: Baltzer, Day, Walker, Greene, Mack, Alexander, Arseneault, Barnes, Bergeron, Boucher, Bourgeau-Chavez, Brown, Carrière, Howard, Gauthier, Parisien, Reid, Rogers, Roland, Sirois, Stehn, Thompson, Turetsky, Veraverbeke, Whitman, Yang, Johnstone
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires pose a significant challenge to the natural and the built environments, as well as the safety and economic wellbeing of the communities residing in wildfire-prone areas. The electric power grid is specifically among the built environments...

Person: Arab, Khodaei, Eskandarpour, Thompson, Wei
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Safety zones (SZs) are critical tools that can be used by wildland firefighters to avoid injury or fatality when engaging a fire. Effective SZs provide safe separation distance (SSD) from surrounding flames, ensuring that a fire’s heat cannot cause...

Person: Campbell, Dennison, Thompson, Butler
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires emit large quantities of particles that affect Earth’s climate and human health. Black carbon (BC), commonly known as soot, is directly emitted to the atmosphere by wildfires and other processes and can be transported and deposited in remote...

Person: Sierra-Hernández, Beaudon, Porter, Mosley-Thompson, Thompson
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This seminar is part of Pennsylvania State University's Earth and Environmental Systems Institute's Fall 2021 EarthTalks Series: Fire in the Earth System(link is external). Fires burn in all terrestrial ecosystems on the globe, and wildfires are...

Person: Thompson
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

In response to this unprecedented threat, our team developed a model to examine the potential impacts of COVID-19 spread in fire camps. The model is based upon Wu et al (2020) and has been tailored to the context of fire camp (i.e., population turnover...

Person: Bayham, Belval, Thompson
Year:
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Motivation. The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020 just as the southwestern region begins to see increased fire activity. The project PIs had been collaborating on other wildfire projects but also had...

Person: Bayham, Belval, Thompson
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In 2016, the USDA Forest Service, the largest wildfire management organization in the world, initiated the risk management assistance (RMA) program to improve the quality of strategic decision-making on its largest and most complex wildfire events. RMA...

Person: Calkin, O'Connor, Thompson, Stratton
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Across the globe, aircraft that apply water and suppressants during active wildfires play key roles in wildfire suppression, and these suppression resources can be highly effective. In the United States, US Department of Agriculture Forest Service (...

Person: Stonesifer, Calkin, Thompson, Belval
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire risks and losses have increased over the last 100 years, associated with population expansion, land use and management practices, and global climate change. While there have been extensive efforts at modeling the probability and severity of...

Person: Carriger, Thompson, Barron
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES