Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Presented By: Scott Rupp

March 28th, 2019. Part of the Interagency Spring Fire Operations Meeting preseason update, an overview was given on the CASC climatology project.

Person: Rupp
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Meeting on Thursday November 29th, 2018 at the Alaska Fire Service on the Alaska Climate Adaption Science Center Wildfire Forecasting. Presenters include: Scott Rupp, Peter Bieniek, Robert (Zeke) Ziel, and Uma Bhatt

Person: Rupp, Bieniek, Ziel, Bhatt
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature....

Person: Genet, McGuire, Barrett, Breen, Euskirchen, Johnstone, Kasischke, Melvin, Bennett, Mack, Rupp, Schuur, Turetsky, Yuan
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper explores whether fundamental differences exist between urban and rural vulnerability to climate-induced changes in the fire regime of interior Alaska. We further examine how communities and fire managers have responded to these changes and...

Person: Trainor, Calef, Natcher, Chapin, McGuire, Huntington, Duffy, Rupp, DeWilde, Kwart, Fresco, Lovecraft
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Mechanical (e.g., shearblading) and manual (e.g., thinning) fuel treatments have become the preferred strategy of many fire managers and agencies for reducing fire hazard in boreal forests. This study attempts to characterize the effectiveness of four...

Person: Butler, Ottmar, Rupp, Jandt, Miller, Howard, Schmoll, Theisen, Vihnanek, Jimenez
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Many boreal forests grow in regions where climate is now warming rapidly. Changes in these vast, cold forests have the potential to affect global climate because they store huge amounts of carbon and because the relative abundances of their different...

Person: Mann, Rupp, Olson, Duffy
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Much of the boreal forest in western North America and Alaska experiences frequent, stand-replacing wildfires. Secondary succession after fire initiates most forest stands and variations in fire characteristics can have strong effects on pathways of...

Person: Johnstone, Rupp, Olson, Verbyla
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In high latitudes, changes in climate impact fire regimes and snow cover duration, altering the surface albedo and the heating of the regional atmosphere. In the western Arctic, under four scenarios of future climate change and future fire regimes (...

Person: Euskirchen, McGuire, Rupp, Chapin, Walsh
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Interactions between vegetation and fire have the potential to overshadow direct effects of climate change on fire regimes in boreal forests of North America. We develop methods to compare sediment-charcoal records with fire regimes simulated by an...

Person: Brubaker, Higuera, Rupp, Olson, Anderson, Hu
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Postfire succession in the Alaskan boreal forest follows several different pathways, the most common being self-replacement and species-dominance relay. In self-replacement, canopy-dominant tree species replace themselves as the postfire dominants. It...

Person: Kurkowski, Mann, Rupp, Verbyla
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS