Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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The annual national report of the Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, presents forest health status and trends from a national or multi-State regional perspective using a variety of sources,...

Person: Potter, Conkling
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Trends and transitions in the growing season MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series at 250-m resolution were analyzed for the period from 2000 to 2018 to understand recent...

Person: Potter
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

United States forestland is an important ecosystem type, land cover, land use, and economic resource that is facing several drivers of change including climatic. Because of its significance, forestland was identified through the National Climate...

Person: Anderson, Heath, Emery, Hicke, Littell, Lucier, Masek, Peterson, Pouyat, Potter, Robertson, Sperry
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Carbon (C) emissions from wildfires are a key terrestrial–atmosphere interaction that influences global atmospheric composition and climate. Positive feedbacks between climate warming and boreal wildfires are predicted based on top-down controls of...

Person: Walker, Rogers, Veraverbeke, Johnstone, Baltzer, Barrett, Bourgeau-Chavez, Day, de Groot, Dieleman, Goetz, Hoy, Jenkins, Kane, Parisien, Potter, Schuur, Turetsky, Whitman, Mack
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires in the boreal forests and peatlands of the ABoVE domain are a natural disturbance agent, but are increasing in frequency and severity. Boreal forest fires impart relatively large forcings on the climate system as a result of (i) typically...

Person: Rogers, Cooperdock, Dieleman, Erb, Goetz, Johnstone, Mack, Moubarak, Phillips, Potter, Randerson, Schaaf, Solvik, Turetsky, Veraverbeke, Walker, Wiggins
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Trends and geographic patterns of change in vegetation phenology metrics and snowmelt timing from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data sets were analyzed across the state of Alaska for all wildfires that burned...

Person: Potter
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is a primary disturbance in boreal forests and generates both positive and negative climate forcings. The influence of fire on surface albedo is a predominantly negative forcing in boreal forests, and one of the strongest overall, due to increased...

Person: Potter, Solvik, Erb, Goetz, Johnstone, Mack, Randerson, Román, Schaaf, Turetsky, Veraverbeke, Walker, Wang, Massey, Rogers
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

As a pervasive disturbance agent operating at many spatial and temporal scales, wildland fre is a key abiotic factor affecting forest health both positively and negatively. In some ecosystems, for example, wildland fres have been essential for...

Person: Potter, Conkling, Potter
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The annual national report of the Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, presents forest health status and trends from a national or multi-State regional perspective using a variety of sources,...

Person: Potter, Conkling
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Boreal forest fires emit large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere primarily through the combustion of soil organic matter1,2,3. During each fire, a portion of this soil beneath the burned layer can escape combustion, leading to a net accumulation of...

Person: Walker, Baltzer, Cumming, Day, Ebert, Goetz, Johnstone, Potter, Rogers, Schuur, Turetsky, Mack
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES