Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Fire disturbance has increased in some tundra ecosystems due to anthropogenic climate change, with important ramifications for terrestrial carbon cycling. Assessment of the potential impact of fire-regime change on tundra carbon stocks requires long-...

Person: Chen, Kelly, Genet, Lara, Chipman, McGuire, Hu
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Increased prescribed burning is needed to provide a diversity of public benefits, including wildfire hazard reduction, improved forest resilience, and biodiversity conservation. Though rare, escaped burns or significant smoke impacts may result in harm...

Person: Varner, Hiers, Wheeler, McGuire, Quinn-Davidson, Palmer, Fowler
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire is a landscape‐scale disturbance that changes the rate and magnitude of many earth surface processes. The impacts of fire on earth surface processes can vary substantially from place to place depending on a variety of site‐specific conditions...

Person: Rengers, McGuire
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Assessments of climate‐change effects on ecosystem processes and services in high‐latitude regions are hindered by a lack of decision‐support tools capable of forecasting possible future landscapes. We describe a collaborative effort to develop and...

Person: Euskirchen, Timm, Breen, Gray, Rupp, Martin, Reynolds, Sesser, Murphy, Littell, Bennett, Bolton, Carman, Genet, Griffith, Kurkowski, Lara, Marchenko, Nicolsky, Panda, Romanovsky, Rutter, Tucker, McGuire
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The slideshow for this project was presented at the February 2013 Bonanza Creek Long-term Ecological Research Symposium.

Person: Schuur, Johnstone, Mack, McGuire, Rupp, Euskirchen, Melvin, Genet
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Following wildfire, mountainous areas of the western United States are susceptible to debris flow during intense rainfall. Convective storms that can generate debris flows in recently burned areas may occur during or immediately after the wildfire,...

Person: Staley, Tillery, Kean, McGuire, Pauling, Rengers, Smith
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire, a dominant disturbance in boreal forests, is highly variable in occurrence and behavior at multiple spatiotemporal scales. New data sets provide more detailed spatial and temporal observations of active fires and the post-burn environment in...

Person: Barrett, Loboda, McGuire, Genet, Hoy, Kasischke
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfires play a key role in the boreal forest carbon cycle1,2, and models suggest that accelerated burning will increase boreal C emissions in the coming century3. However, these predictions may be compromised because brief observational records...

Person: Kelly, Genet, McGuire, Hu
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In the boreal forest of Alaska, increased fire severity associated with climate change is expanding deciduous forest cover in areas previously dominated by black spruce (Picea mariana). Needle-leaf conifer and broad-leaf deciduous species are commonly...

Person: Melvin, Mack, Johnstone, McGuire, Genet, Schuur
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Soil temperature and moisture are important factors that control many ecosystem processes. However, interactions between soil thermal and hydrological processes are not adequately understood in cold regions, where the frozen soil, fire disturbance, and...

Person: Yi, McGuire, Harden, Kasischke, Manies, Hinzman, Liljedahl, Randerson, Liu, Romanovsky, Marchenko, Kim
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS