Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 105

Following wildfire, mountainous areas of the western United States are susceptible to debris flow during intense rainfall. Convective storms that can generate debris flows in recently burned areas may occur during or immediately after the wildfire,...

Person: Staley, Tillery, Kean, McGuire, Pauling, Rengers, Smith
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire, a dominant disturbance in boreal forests, is highly variable in occurrence and behavior at multiple spatiotemporal scales. New data sets provide more detailed spatial and temporal observations of active fires and the post-burn environment in...

Person: Barrett, Loboda, McGuire, Genet, Hoy, Kasischke
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfires play a key role in the boreal forest carbon cycle1,2, and models suggest that accelerated burning will increase boreal C emissions in the coming century3. However, these predictions may be compromised because brief observational records...

Person: Kelly, Genet, McGuire, Hu
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In the boreal forest of Alaska, increased fire severity associated with climate change is expanding deciduous forest cover in areas previously dominated by black spruce (Picea mariana). Needle-leaf conifer and broad-leaf deciduous species are commonly...

Person: Melvin, Mack, Johnstone, McGuire, Genet, Schuur
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Soil temperature and moisture are important factors that control many ecosystem processes. However, interactions between soil thermal and hydrological processes are not adequately understood in cold regions, where the frozen soil, fire disturbance, and...

Person: Yi, McGuire, Harden, Kasischke, Manies, Hinzman, Liljedahl, Randerson, Liu, Romanovsky, Marchenko, Kim
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[1] Wildfire is a common occurrence in ecosystems of northern high latitudes, and changes in the fire regime of this region have consequences for carbon feedbacks to the climate system. To improve our understanding of how wildfire influences carbon...

Person: Balshi, McGuire, Zhuang, Melillo, Kicklighter, Kasischke, Wirth, Flannigan, Harden, Clein, Burnside, McAllister, Kurz, Apps, Shvidenko
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature....

Person: Genet, McGuire, Barrett, Breen, Euskirchen, Johnstone, Kasischke, Melvin, Bennett, Mack, Rupp, Schuur, Turetsky, Yuan
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper explores whether fundamental differences exist between urban and rural vulnerability to climate-induced changes in the fire regime of interior Alaska. We further examine how communities and fire managers have responded to these changes and...

Person: Trainor, Calef, Natcher, Chapin, McGuire, Huntington, Duffy, Rupp, DeWilde, Kwart, Fresco, Lovecraft
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire is an important factor controlling the composition and thickness of the organic layer in the black spruce forest ecosystems of interior Alaska. Fire that burns the organic layer can trigger dramatic changes in the underlying permafrost, leading to...

Person: Jafarov, Romanovsky, Genet, McGuire, Marchenko
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Mosses in northern ecosystems are ubiquitous components of plant communities, and strongly influence nutrient, carbon and water cycling. We use literature review, synthesis and model simulations to explore the role of mosses in ecological stability and...

Person: Turetsky, Bond-Lamberty, Euskirchen, Talbot, Frolking, McGuire, Tuittila
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS